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Chapters 8-10: Teach-Okay

Write a short dialogue, like one of the samples in Chapters 8-10, demonstrating the use of Teach-Okay in one of your favorite lessons.

Pages 44-61
Full credit: 25 WBT Certification Points
Partial credit: 10 WBT Certification Points

Reminder: Please sign your post with your real first and last name. 

185 comments:

  1. Julia Berry / Chapter 8-10 / September

    Lesson: Deductive Reasoning: Helpful Hints to Succeeded
    Vocabulary introduction: “red herrings”, key words, and matrix chart

    Teacher: Classy! Classy!
    Student: Yessy! Yessy!

    Teacher: Wonderful job Deducing Detectives! Today, we are going to think like detectives and learn some steps to help us deduce unnecessary information. Now put on our thinking caps and get started! (Students will mirror my gesture for putting on their thinking caps.)

    We are going to talk about red herrings. A “red herring” is when unnecessary information is added to the content to distract you from solving the problem.

    When I say Teach, turn to your detective partner and teach “red herrings”.
    (One partner will be Watson, the other Holmes)

    After reading each problem, I will then have the students practice in teams to see if they correctly identify the “red herrings” in the problems. The teams will be using red and green pipe cleaners as their visual aid. If the students determine that the problem contains a “red herring”, they will then raise their red pipe cleaners. If there is no “red herring” identified in the problem, the students will raise their green pipe cleaners. This activity contains visual elements in order to create a competitive drive for students to identify the “red herrings”. The students will be eager to raise their pipe cleaners because they will want to be the first of their peers to answer correctly.

    If a team correctly identifies a “red herring”, I will stand behind the team(s) and sing, “red herring” like the Red Robin jingle from the TV commercial. The Detective team(s) with the correct answer will do the same.

    Teaching “red herrings”:
    Teacher: “Holmes, Teach!”
    Student: “Okay, Teach!” (Two claps)
    Teacher: “Okay, let’s have our Watsons teach!”
    Student: “Switch, Okay, Teach!” (Two Claps)
    Teacher: “I can’t hear you…not loud or fast enough for me, and some of you detectives did not clap!” (Scoreboard mark)
    “Lets try again, Switch!”
    Student: “Switch, Okay, Teach!” (Two claps)
    Teacher: “Much better, you were all on track and teaching!”
    (Scoreboard point)

    Our next step will be to underline key words.
    Students will use the following gestures:
    Genders: male - Index fingers to form the shape of a mustache, female - Pinch their ear lobes lightly. Students will raise their hands in the air for the word, above and for the word behind, students will point over their shoulders. For first, the students will hold up one finger. For not, students will form an X with their arms crossed.
    Teacher: “Mirror the following with me, genders, above, behind, first, and not.”
    Teacher: “Classical, Classical!”
    Student: “Yessical, Yessical!”
    Teacher: I am going to give you one more helpful hint today for Deductive Reasoning. When you mark your answer (X means no, O means yes) on your matrix chart, you can only have one O per column or row. It’s kind of like Tic-Tac-Toe, but the opposite!
    Students will repeat and mirror after me: One O going across or down. (Students will use their index finger and thumb to make an O and move sideways and then down.) If you have more than one O in a column or row, you will know that your answer is not correct.
    Teacher: “Class, Class, Teach!” (Holmes first, then Watsons)
    Students: “Yes, Yes, Teach!”
    Teacher: “Class, Switch!”
    Student: “Yes, Switch!”
    Teacher: “Now, you’re all on your way to making an A!”
    “Oh detectives, you did so great today!”

    Students will then be asked to come up to the Smart Board and practice their newly learned skills with their partner. They will pick out the “red herrings”, key words, and place X’s and O’s on the matrix charts correctly. For the past three weeks, I have been using the “Teach Okay” procedure. Wow, what a difference! No more hands were raised to repeat instructions and students were very attentive and enthusiastic throughout the lesson.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julia,
      Nice job! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  2. Setting: Kindergarten Math right after lunch!

    Teacher: One, two, three, CLASS!

    Students: One, two, three, YES?

    Teacher: Yesterday we taught the number one (hold up one finger in a big gesture) and that we spell "1” O (touch shoulder)-N-(touch elbow) E. (touch wrist). Today, we are going teach our partner all about the number "2!" When you have two of something, you have enough for you and a friend!
    We spell the number"2" (hold up two fingers in a big gesture) and that we spell "2" "T" (touch shoulder) "W"(touch elbow) "O" (touch wrist). TEACH!

    Students: OKAY!
    Students turn to their partner and teach all about the number 2. I walk around our circle listening, encouraging, repeating enthusiastically if students are quiet or looking puzzled and giving thumbs up if students are using really big gestures!

    Teacher: 2-2-2 Class!

    Students: 2-2-2 YES!

    Teacher: Great job teaching your partner all about the number two! Let's review how we spell two together: We spell the number"2" (hold up two fingers in a big gesture) and that we spell "2" "T" (touch shoulder) "W"(touch elbow) "O" (touch wrist). One more time! We spell the number"2" (hold up two fingers in a big gesture) and that we spell "2" "T" (touch shoulder) "W"(touch elbow) "O" (touch wrist).


    Respectfully,

    Krissa White

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Krissa,
      You could even break this down more by inserting a teach/okay after each step. For example, after you remind them what they learned yesterday (o n e- teach/okay), and then after you have enough for you and a friend (teach/okay), and then at the end review the o n e again too with a teach/okay. Repetition builds those dendrites! Nice job, here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  3. Deborah Gardner
    Chapters 8- 10/Teach Okay Script
    Lesson: Wonderful Water—The Unique and Amazing Properties of Water.
    Teacher: (In a high, teasing voice) C…L…A…S…S…!
    Students: (In a higher even more teasing voice) Y…E…S…S…!
    T: You’ve been doing a fabulous job teaching each other the Five Rules with such wonderful, gigantic gestures that today I think you are going to be even better teaching each other some “Wonderful Water Words”! Turn to your shoulder partner and share what you are going to learn/teach today. (Clap! Clap!) Teach…! (Use flat hands out signal)
    S: Clap! Clap! Okay! Students enthusiastically tell each other what we are going to learn in science—giggling all the way!
    T: Oh Science Class!
    S: Oh Science Yes!
    T: Today we are going to learn about some very interesting and unique properties of water. (Body is swaying with hands over heart for wonderful. Then hands make a flowing motion across body to simulate flowing water.) Clap! Clap! Whoosh….Teach!
    S: Clap! Clap! Whoosh…Okay! Again the laughter and noise begins as they tell each other what they are going to learn with the hand/body motions.
    T: Splish, splash Class!
    S: Splish, splash Yes!
    T: NOW….You is a drip if you are right!!!!! You’re a drop if you are left!!!!(In a sing-songy voice) Teach!
    S: Repeat the above.
    T: Pitter, Patter, Class!
    S: Pitter, Patter, Yes!
    T: M…A…G…N…I…F…I…C…A…T…I…O…N! Our first marvelous water property is “magnification”—making objects appear larger than what they actually are. Wonderful water enlarges objects. (Use huge arm motion to show enlarge.) Drippity, Drop, Drop… Turn and Teach to Partner “Drip” until I say YOU HAVE TO SWITCH TOTHE DROP!” (Hand up to indicate traditional STOP.) TEACH DRIP…
    S: Drippity, Drop, Drop….We teach, and then we switch when you say DROP! (Students turn to their science shoulder partner and repeat the definition of magnification until…)
    T: Drippity, Drippity, Switch to the DROP! The second student teaches the definition. (There was a lot of laughter here and wild hand motions!)
    T: Classity, class, class!
    S: Yessity, yes, yes.
    (This is where we experimented with hand magnification lenses using a water-filled plastic indentation in cardboard that we made the day before. I did not tell the students what we were making. They were quite happy and surprised when the lenses worked and they could actually see the property of magnification with their own hand-made lens. The lesson continued the next day with experimentation on refraction and reflection. )
    Deborah Gardner

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deborah,
      That sounds like a lesson filled with funtricity! There was one grammatical error "You is a drip if you are right" (are) Here are 20 certification points!

      Delete
  4. Lesson: Learning the Vowels
    Kindergarten

    Teacher: Oh Class!
    Students: Oh Yes!
    Teacher: Today we will practice the vowels. You know the sign with your hands for each vowel letter. Review each vowel with me and make its sign. (Students use their learned letter sign for each vowel.) Yes, yes, good job!
    Vowels have two sounds. The sound where it says its own name is called a long vowel. The other sound is called the short sound. Today we are going to work on the short sounds.
    Class, Class!
    Students: Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: Say the vowels with me.
    Class: a,e,i,o,u
    Teacher: Now here are the faces that you need to make with each short vowel sound. When you say, “a makes aaaaa”, open your mouth wide. When you say, “e makes eeeee”, smile big. When you say, “I makes iiiii”, wrinkle up your nose. When you say “o makes ooooo”, bring your jaw down. When you say “u makes uuuuu, stick our your jaw.
    Sign each vowel letter while saying its short sound and use your cute face to teach your classroom neighbor. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach what the teacher just told them to teach.)
    Teacher: Smart Class!
    Students: Smart Yes!
    Teacher: Let’s review the five vowels by using their sign and the faces that go with them. A makes aaaaa, e makes eeeee, i makes iiiii, o makes ooooo, u makes uuuuu. Tell your neighbor that vowels are easy and fun while you make a very happy face. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students imitate the teacher’s very happy face and tell their neighbor that vowels are easy and fun.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joy,
      Adding the signs for each vowel is a great plan! You could add many more "teach/okay" moments in your lesson. For example, after the sentence "....own name is called a long vowel (t/o), and "today we are going to work on the short sounds" (t/o). Then, break down a teach/okay after each individual letter "a makes aaaaa, open your mouth wide" (teach/okay), and so on for each letter. Here are 20 certification points!

      Delete
    2. As I said, they already know the signs. Sometimes we break it down and sometimes we do them all. I always have them do it as needed for the lesson. With 19 students, I have a group of varied learning levels.

      Delete
  5. Social Studies Grade 2
    Essential Question: “What is a Physical Map?”
    Teacher: Social Studies books out, Class!
    Student: Social Studies books out, Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to talk about maps. Maps are very important. They help us get from one place to another without getting lost. Maps allow us to know where we are going. Maps also give us direction when we are in an unknown area. Tell your partner when you would use a map and why. (Stomp, Stomp) Teach!
    Student: (Stomp, Stomp) Okay! (Students will give an example as to when they would use a map and teach their partner why maps are important.)
    Teacher: Classity, Class, Class!
    Student: Yessity, Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: Mirrors on, Class!
    Students: Mirrors on, Yes!
    Teacher: There are many different kinds of maps but today we are just going to talk about 1. (Making the number 1 with my hand) We are going to learn about Physical (I brush my arm lightly) Maps (pretend I am looking at or holding a map). Teeeaaach!
    Student: Okay! (Students will tell their neighbor what we are going to learn about in Social Studies using the same gestures.)
    Teacher: Oh, Class!
    Student: Oh, Yes!
    Teacher: Mirrors on, Class, Class
    Student: Mirrors on, Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: A Physical Maps (repeat gesture for physical maps) shows mountains (hands go over my head to form a mountain peak), Rivers (hands clap together to make a winding snake-like gesture), Lakes (arms make a big bowl) and Oceans (arms spread wide). Teach!
    Student: Okay! (Students will teach their partner what a physical map is using hand gestures.)
    Teacher: I like using maps, especially if I’m going somewhere knew. Tell your neighbor why you like maps. Snap, snap, Teach!
    Student: Snap, snap, Okay! (Students share why they like using a map.

    Brandi Young

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brandi,
      Nice job! You could even break that 1st paragraph down and do a teach/okay after each purpose to use a map. There was one minor error "A physical maps... shows mountains" (map). Here are 20 certification points and a 5 point bonus for the added details!

      Delete
  6. Teach-Okay - Weathering Bethany Kirkland

    Teacher: Class, class!
    Students: Yes, yes!
    Teacher: When I say Teach!, you say Okay!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher: If I say Teach! Teach! Teach!, you say Okay! Okay! Okay! Teachy, Teach!
    Students: Okayee! Okay!
    Teacher: When I say Teach!, you say Okay! And turn your body toward your neighbor and teach.
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about one way the earth changes! Tell your neighbor how fun it will be to learn about earth changes! Teach, Teach!
    Students: Okay, Okay! Students turn toward each other and repeat what the teacher said.
    Teacher: Weathering is when water or ice breaks down rocks. Teach, teach!
    Students: Okay, okay.
    Students fumble with the information and gestures.
    Teacher: Classy, classy!
    Students: Yessy, yes!
    Hands making fists, arms “chugging” forward, and leaning body back
    Teacher: Put on bakes and back up!
    Students: Errrk!
    Teacher: Let’s try this again! Classer class!
    Students: Yesser Yes!
    Teacher: Weathering (making a “W“ ASL sign) is when water (making a side to side waving gesture with your hand) or ice (making a gesture of pounding fists) break down rocks, (making a rock gesture in a downward motion with fingers spreading).
    Teacher reviews several times using gestures with the students.
    Teacher: Now using energetic gestures, Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher circulates and listens for comprehension and accuracy.
    Teacher: Oh Claaaaasss!
    Students: Oh Yeeeesss!
    Teacher: Good Teaching!
    Teacher: Now when I say Switch! You say Switch! And the macs will be the teachers and the cheese will be the listeners! Switch!
    Students: Switch!
    Students switch teachers and teach again using gestures while teacher circulates checking for accuracy and comprehension.
    Teacher: Give yourself a mighty pat on the back! Now give yourself a handshake! Now give yourself a Mighty Oh Yeah!
    Students follow instruction.
    Teacher: You have made your dear teacher happy! Let’s give each other a ten finger woo!
    Students: Woo! Gesturing with fingers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bethany,
      Fantastic job! Here are 25 certification points and a 10 point bonus!

      Delete
  7. Script: Teaching two kinds of letters and vowel letters

    Teacher: Alphabet, Class!
    Students: Alphabet, Yes!
    Teacher: You’ve been doing a stupendous job at learning about the
    alphabet letters. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partner what the teacher has
    said.)
    Teacher: Letters, Class!
    Students: Letters, Yes!
    Teacher: You have been learning about the sounds of all the letters
    we call the alphabet. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partner what the teacher has
    said.)
    Teacher: Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Now, I want you to know that there are two kinds of
    letters. The two kinds of letters are vowel letters and
    consonant letters. (The teacher holds up one finger for
    vowel letters and a second finger for consonant letters.)
    Teach your partner that there are two kinds of letters
    called vowel letters and consonant letters
    using your one and two finger gestures. Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students use finger gestures to teach their partner
    that there are two kinds of letters. There are vowel
    letters and consonant letters.
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: You know there are two kinds of letters. There are
    vowel letters and consonant letters. Now you need
    to know the names of the vowel letters. The vowel
    letters are A, E, I, O, U. (The teacher uses her arms to
    body spell the vowel letters A, E, I, O, U. The teacher
    repeats the vowel letters by using her arms to body spell
    the vowel letters A, E, I, O, U.) Now, use your arms
    to teach your partner the vowel letters A, E, I, O, U.
    Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partner by using their
    arms to body spell the vowel letters A, E, I, O, U.)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Kay,
    Great job! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Lesson: Rounding numbers
    Grade: 3rd

    Teacher: Classity Class!
    Student: Yessity Yes!

    Teacher: Today we are going to understand how to round numbers to the nearest ten and hundred. It’s easy! Look at your partner and tell them how easy it is to learn how to round! Teach!
    Student: Okay!
    Teacher: La Clase, clase!
    Student: Si, si!
    Teacher: When you round to the nearest hundred or ten, you always look to the place value before it to tell it what to do. Teach!
    Student: Okay!
    Teacher: Shock-a-boom boom class!
    Student: Shock-a-boom boom yes!
    Teacher: On the board I have the numbers 0,1,2,3 and 4 with an arrow pointing to the right. These numbers tell you to stay the same. I also have a 5,6,7,8 and 9 with an arrow pointing upwards. These numbers tell you to go up. Teach!

    Student: Okay!
    Teacher: Class, class, class
    Student: Yes, yes, yes!
    Teacher: I have written the number 762 on the board. If I round to the nearest hundred, I look at the place value before it to tell the seven what to do. This is a 6. Tell your partner what you do with the number 6. Teach!

    Student: Okay!
    Teacher: Class, class!
    Student: Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: What do we do with a six class?
    Student: Go Up!
    Teacher: Excellent! A 6 tells the 7 in the hundreds place to go up to an 8. Well done! Look at your partner and review what you just learned today on rounding numbers. Teach!
    Student: Okay!


    Liz Cheney

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Liz,
      Great job! Rounding is always a struggle isn't it? You could even add another teach/okay after this sentence: "On the board I have the numbers 0,1,2,3 and 4 with an arrow pointing to the right. These numbers tell you to stay the same", to break it down even more and allow more repetition. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  10. Teacher: Class!
    Class: Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to talk about narrative story elements. These are the elements that make up a story, the characters, setting, plot, and solution. Teach! (Clap)
    Class: Okay! (Clap) (Students teach each other what teacher just taught about narrative story elements.)
    Teacher: Class, OH, Class!
    Class: Yes, OH, Yes!
    Teacher: Characters are who or what the story is about. Characters can be people or animals. Mirror with words: Characters are who or what the story is about. (Hand motion of finger going around face for who) Teach! (Clap twice)
    Class: Okay! (Clap twice) (Students teach each other about characters.)
    Teacher: Character, Class!
    Class: Character, Yes!
    Teacher: Now we have the setting. The setting is where and when the story takes place. This could be a place, a season, or a time of day. The setting could also change in a story, so we might have more than one. Mirror with words: The setting is where and when the story takes place. (Hand motion palm up and move it around in a circle to indicate where you are). Teach! (Motion with magic wand)
    Class: Okay! (Motion with magic wand) (Students teach each other about settings.)
    Teacher: Setting, Class!
    Class: Setting, Yes!
    Teacher: Now we come to plot and solution. The plot is the problem and the solution is how it is solved. When we read a story it is usually about a character who has a problem and the story tells us how they solved their problem. Mirror with words: The plot is the problem and the solution is how it is solved. Teach! (Snap fingers twice)
    Class: Ok! (Snap fingers twice) (Students teach each other about plot and solution.)
    Teacher: Plot Solving, Class!
    Class: Plot Solving, Yes!
    Teacher: Let’s review one more time. Mirror with words: Characters are who or what the story is about. (Hand motion of finger going around face for who) The setting is where and when the story takes place. (Hand motion palm up and move it around in a circle to indicate where you are) The plot is the problem and the solution is how it is solved. Teachity, Teachity!
    Class: Okaity, Okaity! (Students teach each other what teacher just reviewed.)
    Teacher: Amazing Class, Class!
    Class: Amazing Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: Now I want you to work with your partners to complete the graphic organizer with the characters, setting, plot, and solution for our reading story. Ready! (Fist pump in the air)
    Class: Ok! (Fist pump in the air) (Students beginning working together to complete graphic organizer.)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Tonya,
    Nice job! You could even break it down again with a teach/okay between plot and solution too for more reinforcement if needed. Here are 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Lesson: More Than (Using Numbers 0-5)
    Grade: Kindergarten

    Teacher: (Clap, clap) Class?
    Students: (Clap, clap) Yes!

    Teacher:
    We have already learned about the numbers 0-5 and what they represent. Show your partner how we count to five using our fingers. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    I float to make sure students are holding up the right amount of fingers as they count.

    Teacher: 5, 4, 3, 2 Class!
    Students: 5, 4, 3, 2 Yes!

    Teacher: Now we are going to learn how to tell when one number is more than another number. When we're counting that's when we put up more fingers. (As this is being explained, the teacher sticks thumbs up and shows counting to 5 on her fingers.) Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    I float to make sure students understand the concept and are doing the gestures.

    Teacher: 1, 2, 3, 4 Class!
    Students: 1, 2, 3, 4 Yes!

    Teacher: (Show 3 counters on the projector.) I count 3 counters (show on fingers) and I want to know a number that is more. I know that "more" means that I put up more fingers (show on fingers.) 4 fingers are more than (thumbs up) 3! Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    I float to make sure students are explaining the concept and holding up the correct number of fingers as they do so.

    Teacher: Class, class!
    Students: Yes, yes!

    Teacher: (Show 2 counters on the projector.) Let's count together and show me on your fingers. (Make sure students are holding up 2 fingers.) Now turn to your partner and show them a number that is more (thumbs up) than 2. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    I float to make sure students understand the concept and are holding up the correct number of fingers.

    Teacher: 1, 2, class, class!
    Class: 1, 2, yes, yes!

    Teacher: What number is more than 2 class?!

    Class: 3!

    Teacher: Great job! 3 (show on fingers) is more (thumbs up) than 2! Roller coaster woo!

    Class: Woo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Josephine,
      Nice lesson! Good use of Teach-Okay to get lots of reps in! Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  13. Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about addends! Tell your neighbor how excited you are to learn about addends! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: Classity class!
    Students: Yessity yes!
    Teacher: Addends are the numbers you add together to get an answer. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: Ooohhh class!
    Students: Ooohhh yes!
    Teacher: When we add 3+2 these numbers are the addends. (Hold up 3 fingers on one hand and 2 fingers on the other hand as you say the numbers.) Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said using their fingers.)
    Teacher: Ahoy class!
    Students: Ahoy yes!
    Teacher: In the addition sentence, 3+1=4, the addends are 3 and 1. (Write the addition sentence on the board as you say it.) Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: Class! Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Now, let’s review. Addends are the numbers you add together to get an answer. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)

    Amanda Conley

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amanda,
      I appreciate the variety in your Class-Yes to raise the class energy. Students need lots of repetitions to cement a lesson, which means lots of class energy! Oh, yeah! Here are 25 points!

      Delete
  14. Lesson : Introducing Genre
    Setting: Kindergarten Classroom, Whole Group Reading Instruction

    * Our new Reading Series, “Reading Wonders” emphasizes identifying the genres of books and stories. Having never taught this terminology to kindergartners before I was concerned that it may be problematic. Using the WBT methods, my students not only understand the definition of genre, they are getting pretty good at identifying them!

    Teacher: Bon Jour Class!
    Class: Bon Jour Yes!

    Teacher: (using gestures and pointing to a display of various types of books) Today we (sweeping hand across group) are going to learn about (point to head with both hands) a way to identify (hold up imaginary magnifying glass) different kinds of stories and books. Turn to your partner and remind (point to head with one hand) him that to “identify” (hold up imaginary magnifying glass) something is to find out what it is (shrug shoulders). (clap, pat, clap) Teeeee-aaaach!
    Class: (clap, pat, clap) Okaaaa-aaay!

    Teacher: Oh Class! (high, operatic voice)
    Class: Oh Yes! (mimicking voice)

    Teacher: (using gestures) One way that we can identify a story is by its “genre” (shrugging and looking confused). “Genre” is kind of a scary word but are we scared?
    Class: We’re not scared! (a routine established for when new concepts are introduced)

    Teacher: (sweeping hand away from face in circular motions) “Genre” is really just a (pretending to hold cup with pinkie lifted) fancy French word. Turn to your partner and teach him that “genre” is just a fancy word. (clap, clap, clap) Teach, Teach, Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap, clap) Okay, Okay, Okay!

    Teacher: Class, Class, Oh My Class!
    Class: Yes, Yes, Oh My Yes!

    Teacher: (fold hands, lean in, and speak in a more serious voice) Hands and Eyes
    Class: Hands and Eyes. (copying voice and gestures)

    Teacher: (using gestures) Now that you know that “genre” is just a fancy word, we are going to learn what it means. “Genre” (sweeping hand away from face in circular motions) tells (cup hands around mouth) what kind (shrugging shoulders) of story (two flat hands together) it is. Repeat. Mirror with Words!
    Class: Okay with Words! (I realize this is not the standard WBT response, but my class invented it and we went with it.) (Repeat several times.)

    Teacher: High-Ho Classy-O!
    Class: High-Ho Yessy-O!

    Teacher: Now, this time I want you to turn to your partner and teach him what a genre is. The Bubble Guppies will teach then the Octonauts will take over when I say “Switch”. Remember to use big gestures for both speaking and listening. (clap, snap, clap) Teach Up a Storm!
    Class: (clap, snap, clap) Okay Up a Storm!

    Teacher: Switch-a-Roo, Buck-a-Roo!
    Class: Okay-a-Roo, Buck-a-Roo!

    Teacher: Yee-Haw Class!
    Class: Yee-Haw Yes!

    Teacher: Great Job! You have earned a Smiley!
    Class: Oh Yeah!

    Teacher: Class, Class, Bring It On Back!
    Class: Yes, Yes, On the Right Track!

    Julia Simons

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julia,
      Well done! Here are 25 points and a 5 point Bonus for incorporating a variety of WBT techniques!

      Delete
  15. Second grade math lesson- reviewing key vocabulary words( tens frame, tens, ones, more, fewer, digits, count on and count back)
    Teacher: Whoomp! There it is class!
    Students: Whoomp! There it is yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to review some important vocabulary words for math using our motions that we have been learning. Clap! Clap! Clap! Teach!
    Students: Clap! Clap! Clap! Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: Classity, class, class!
    Students: Yessity, yes, yes!
    Teacher: The first words we are going to illustrate are tens frame, tens, and ones. (Holds up 10 fingers, make a rectangular box with fingers and say,"a tens frame has ten spaces. Then holding up 10 fingers shout out "ten" and then hold up 1 finger on both hands and shout "ones.") Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students use their fingers and teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said)
    Teacher: Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Now we are going to illustrate the followiwng words: more (open arms really wide), fewer (scrunch up shoulders and use squeaky voice), digits (count on fingers), count on (roll arms forward and take two steps forward), count back(roll arms backward and take two steps backward). Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students do the same motions with their neighbors. The students especially love the count on and count back.)
    Teacher: Classsssssssss!
    Students: Yesssssssssss!
    Teacher: Now let's review and do all of the motions together! Teach! Teach! Teach!
    Students: Okay! Okay! Okay! (Everyone, teacher includes goes through the motions while saying all of the vocabulary words. There is a lot of fun and laughter going on!)
    Teacher: Excellent job! Class give yourselves a MIGHTY OH YEAH!!!
    Students: OH YEAH!!!

    Karlyn Davis

    ReplyDelete
  16. Karlyn,
    Great gestures and engagement! Even during review lessons, I would encourage using more Teach-Okay segments to break up the number of vocabulary words in each practice. This will provide lots of repetitions for all students, and encourage more success for those still grasping the concepts. Here are 25 points!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Chapters 8-10 Teach-Okay

    Grade: 4th Grade Gifted Resource
    Lesson: Chemistry: Determining the Number of Protons, Electrons, and Neutrons in Atoms using the APE MAN method

    Teacher: Class, Class
    Students: Yes, Yes

    Teacher: Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons, Class!
    Students: Parts of the Atom, Yes!
    (A previously learned “Class-Yes”)

    Teacher: Today, we are going to learn how to find out the number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in atoms of some of the common elements, using the Periodic Table and the APE MAN method, (saying APE MAN with a gorilla type growl, beating the chest, and scratching underarms like a gorilla)

    Teacher: APE MAN, Class!
    (Teacher uses a gorilla type growl, beating the chest, and scratching the underarms like a gorilla)
    Class: APE MAN, Yes!
    (Repeating APE MAN with a gorilla type growl, beating the chest, and scratching the underarms like a gorilla)

    Teacher: In this method for figuring out the number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in a specific atom, the
    APE stands for this: A=Atomic Number = Protons = Electrons
    MAN stands for this: Mass –Atomic Number = Neutrons
    (This acronym is drawn on a white board using the Document Camera for students to see.)
    So, the Atomic Number on the Periodic Table is always equal to the number of protons and that is always equal to the number of electron,
    Then to find the number of neutrons, you find the Mass on the Periodic Table and subtract the Atomic Number (protons) and you get the number of Neutrons!
    Teacher demonstrates several examples on the document camera, using a small white board.
    Students are then given a small board and markers for each group of two students.

    Teacher: Once we learn how to find the numbers of the proton, neutrons, and electrons, we will learn how to draw atoms in our next lesson!

    So, when I say Teach, you teach your partner the APE MAN method of figuring out the numbers of electrons, protons, and neutrons in an atom. Use the APE MAN gestures, beating your chest, scratching your underarms, making Ape noises, but just make sure you teach the method and write down the numbers on the white board, like I did in the examples.


    Teacher: Teach! (Claps hands twice!)

    Class: Okay! (Clapping hands twice, the Students, use the teaching rules of APE MAN and the gestures, and teach their partner what the teacher has explained, using the small white board. Students are acting silly, having fun acting like an “APE MAN”, but they are engaged in their learning and are teaching their partners.)

    Teacher: Great Job! Now when I say Switch, the other person will Teach APE MAN and other will listen

    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Switch!
    (Students switch places, as one teaches the other about the APE MAN method, using the same techniques as above.)

    Lori Hahn

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lori,
      Great lesson! I would add one or two more Teach-Okays to the section between the APE MAN acronym intro/review and the discussion of determining the electron, proton, and neutron counts. Nice choice of "Switch!" to increase reps and engagement! Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  18. Lesson objective: Students will learn the meaning of a vocabulary word and use the word in their own sentence.

    Teacher: Class! Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: Today we will practice using the vocabulary word “dazzling” in a sentence. Please turn to your partner and tell them what we will do with the vocabulary word “dazzling”. (Claps twice.) Teach!

    Students: (Claps twice.) Okay! (Each student takes turns repeating what the teacher just said.)

    Teacher: Okay, Class!
    Students: Okay, Yes!

    Teacher: Here is a quick review of what the word “dazzling” means. Something dazzling is so bright that it’s almost blinding. Turn to your partner and tell them what the word dazzling means. (Claps twice.) Teach!

    Students: (Claps twice.) Okay! (Students will tell their partner the meaning of the word dazzling.)

    Teacher walks around room to check for comprehension of the meaning of the word.

    Teacher: Okay, my dear class!
    Students: Okay, my dear yes!

    Teacher: The fireworks in the night sky were bright and dazzling. Turn to your partner and tell them your own sentence with the word dazzling. (Claps twice.) Teach!

    Students: (Claps twice.) Okay! (The students turn to face their partners to tell them their sentence.)

    Teacher: We’re finished my class!
    Students: We’re finished oh yes!

    Teacher: Your earned a” mighty Oh, yeah” for a job well done!
    Students: “Oh, yeah!”

    Lori Crigler



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lori,
      Nice job of chunking your lesson with Teach-Okay! One suggestion I would offer in regards to the student created sentence is to ask the students to create with their partner as many sentences as they can using the vocabulary word, dazzling. This gives all learners the opportunity to participate at their own pace, while increasing the opportunity for lesson reps. This also reduces the chance for off task behaviors from students who may finish their sentence very quickly. What do you think? Here's 25 points for you!

      Delete
    2. I like that idea and appreciate your feedback.

      Delete
  19. Working on Multiplication Facts in class, I teach jingles to help my students remember.

    Teacher: Today we’re going to be working on our 8’s in multiplication. Look to your neighbor and say “I’m going to rock my 8’s!”

    Class: (turning to partners) “I’m going to rock my 8’s!”

    Teacher: My favorite way to remember 7 X 8 is a song that I learned when I was in third grade. Listen, “5, 6, 7, 8, 56 is 7x8!” Now, mirrors on, with words!

    Class: “mirrors on, with words!”

    Teacher: 5, 6, 7, 8

    Class: 5, 6, 7, 8

    Teacher: 56 is 7x8

    Class: 56 is 7x8

    Teacher: Mirrors off (students turn mirrors off). Now that we know the jingle, I want to be sure we know it so well that we can teach it to our neighbors! Ready? TEACH!

    Class: OKAY! (students turn to neighbors and repeat the multiplication jingle to each other)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kasey,
      This is a good intro to a teach-okay lesson plan. Wait until you read the chapter about a 5 step lesson plan. It will bring everything together. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  20. 4th Grade Music Class – (re)introducing rhythmic note values

    T/S: Class!/Yes!
    T: Listen to the speech piece called “I wish”. Pat the steady beat gently while you follow the lyrics of the piece. Clap, Teach!
    S: Clap, Okay! (Teach directions while teacher scans room to make sure everyone is in the right place in the textbook)
    T: (after listening to “I Wish”) Why do you think the poet wrote her words down?
    S: To remember and to share it with other people.
    T: Writing songs is a way to remember and share music. Today you will find out more about writing the rhythm of a song. Clap, Teach!
    S: Clap, Okay!(repeat lesson objective)
    T/S: (Singing) Class, Class!/Yes, Yes!
    T: You are doing a fabulous job! Look at the rhythms on page 14 with me while I describe what they look like. (Teacher explains the appearance of a quarter note, two eighth notes, half note and quarter rest) A quarter note looks like a filled in oval with a stem. Teach-y, Teach-y, Teach!
    S: Okay-y, Okay-y, Okay (Students explain what a quarter note looks like)
    T/S: (In rhythm) Class, Class, Class, Class/Yes, Yes, Yes, Yes
    T: Listen to the recorded lesson “Grandfather Clock” and create movements for all the note values we have learned about. (Play recorded lesson and model movements required in lesson)
    T: You did a great job finding body movements for the quarter note, half note and two eighth notes. The only value we didn't put a movement to was a quarter rest. When I say “teach”, you say “okay” and decide with your music partner what movement would be best for one beat of silence, a quarter rest.
    T/S: Teach/Okay (students work together to create a silent motion to represent a quarter rest)

    -Kimberly Gandrup

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kimberly,
      Good start with your teach-okay lesson. One suggestion would be to really chunk down your sentences a little more. For example, teach "Writing songs is a way to remember and share music." then the students teach each other. Then give your direction and students teach that. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  21. Teach-Okay / Tami Madison / Learning the number 5
    Setting: The class is sitting "criss-cross applesauce on the rug for circle time awaiting directions.

    Teacher: "Oh smart Math claaass!! (drawn out)
    Students: "Oh smart Math yeeess!! (laughing and drawn out)
    Teacher: When I say teach you say okay!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher: Now, when I say teach, you are going to turn quickly to your partner with your knees touching and say okay!
    Teacher: Teach!!
    Students: (turning quickly towards each other) Okay!!
    Teacher: Now that we have practiced teach/okay I want to tell you what you will be learning about today. (In an elevated and excited voice I announce today's lesson.)
    Classity Class!! (students respond a resounding yessity yes!) Today we will learn the number 5!!!!!
    Teacher: Now teach!!
    Students: (turning towards each other) Okay!!! Today we will learn the number 5!!!
    Teacher: Oh class!
    Students: Oh Yes!
    Teacher: Mirrors with words (using large gestures) I want you to hold up your hand and count with me on your fingers to 5. 1,2,3,4,5! Now teach!!!
    Students: Okay!!! 1,2,3,4,5! (Students use hands to "mirror" the gesture of counting on their hands.)
    This activity is repeated several times as I am walking around the room, monitoring progress, and assisting as needed. At this point, we have learned the numbers 1-4 and are progressing to the number 5 for today's lesson.

    Teacher: give me a 5 finger woooo!!! (using just one hand to further enforce the number 5.
    Teacher: Now I am going to teach you how to make the number 5. Teach!!
    Students: Okay!!
    Teacher: Oh number 5 claaasss!!
    Students: Oh number 5 yeeeesss!!
    Teacher: Mirror with words (I make large movements with my hands closing and then opening them slowly to build anticipation.) (Large motions and said with a southern accent) Straight stick down (one finger drawn in a downward motion), a big 'ole belly (finger curves around), and a hat on his head!! (A horizontal line is drawn at the top of the imaginary five.)
    Now teach!!!
    Students: Okay!!! (students are using large gestures to create their own imaginary 5's in the air using their fingers.) Straight stick down, a big 'ole belly, and a hat on his head!!!
    This activity is repeated several times as I am walking around the room, monitoring progress, and assisting as needed.
    Teacher: Yeehah class!!!
    Students: Yeehah yes!!!

    Teacher: You learned how to count all the way to five on your fingers today! You also learned how to make the number 5. Now give your partner a high 5!! ( I like to give a general (sweeping) high 5 to the class after saying this) Ya-hoooo!!!
    Students: (giving partner a high 5) Ya-hoooo!!!

    I have also used teach/okay in small groups making one child the "teacher" and the other two her students. The motivation is strong with this activity, because they all want a turn being the teacher!! Okay!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good job, Tami! Here are your 25 certification points!

      Delete
  22. TEACHER: Oooooh, CLASS!
    STUDENTS: Oooooh, YES!
    TEACHER: Remember yesterday when we began talking about what resources our earth provides us?
    STUDENTS: Yes!
    TEACHER: Thinking about all of the minerals and rocks that are present in the layers of earth, we are going to talk today about how to classify those rocks. I tell you what, our lesson is going to rock!
    STUDENTS: (Students laugh!)
    TEACHER: We are going to talk about three different kinds of rocks and why those rocks are considered that type of rock. I want you to think of any kinds of rocks that you can. Now turn to your face partner and discuss any kinds of rocks you can think of.
    STUDENTS: (Students turn and talk, listing any rocks they have in their knowledge.)
    TEACHER: Class, oh class!
    STUDENTS: Yes, oh yes!
    TEACHER: What were some different rocks that you discussed?
    STUDENTS: (Students share any ideas that they and their partner brainstormed.)
    TEACHER: That’s great, class!
    STUDENTS: That’s great, yes!
    TEACHER: Now to be very clear, one type of rock is called igneous rock. This type of rock is formed when magma or molten rock cools. How quickly it cools determines if the mineral crystals will be large or small. If it cools quickly, the crystals are small. If it cools slowly, the crystals are larger. Now, teeeeeach!
    STUDENTS: Oookaaayyy! (Then they teach their partner what they know about igneous rocks.)
    TEACHER: Fabulous, class!
    STUDENTS: Fabulous, yes!
    TEACHER: The second kind of rock we are going to discuss is metamorphic rock. When rocks form underground, the pressure and heat from the layers of the earth can cause rocks and minerals to change. When a rock changes from one form, like igneous, it is called metamorphic rock. Teach, rocks!
    STUDENTS: Okay, rocks! (Then they teach their partner what they know about metamorphic rocks.)
    TEACHER: Class-class!
    STUDENTS: Yes-yes!
    TEACHER: The last rock type is sedimentary rock. It is formed when layers of sediment like dirt, clay, and other minerals are pressed together and they form layers. Show me what you know! Teach-teach!
    STUDENTS: Okay- Okay! (Then they teach their partner what they know about metamorphic rocks.)
    TEACHERS: Excellent job, class!
    STUDENTS: Excellent job, yes!
    TEACHER: You really know your stuff! Now summarize what you know on this chart that has an example of each of the three rocks that we learned! You rock!

    Cheyanne Forbes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheyanne,
      Great job with your teach-okay lesson. This is a big concept so I would suggest chunking your sentences even more to improve it. Take a look at this sample:
      T: We are going to talk about three different kinds of rocks and why those rocks are considered that type of rock. Teach!
      S: Okay! (Repeat)
      T: I want you to think of any kinds of rocks that you can. Now turn to your face partner and discuss any kinds of rocks you can think of. Teach!
      S: Okay!
      Here are your 25 certification points!

      Delete
  23. Teach-Okay

    Teach-Okay

    I enjoy this aspect of WBT, and I have had excellent results using this with my fourth grade writing classes. I will share how I used Teach-Okay to help my students memorize the parts of an expository essay.

    Teacher: Oh most wonderful writing class…
    Class: Oh most wonderful writing yes…

    Today we are going to master the parts of an expository essay. I cannot possible teach this as well as you can, so I am going to need you to teach your partner.

    At this point, I gave each student a color-coded copy of exactly what I wanted the students to know. (The material was color-coded in green, yellow, red, and blue to coordinate with the Step Up to Writing colors.) We read the document to make sure the students knew all the words. I projected the first step on the board and modeled what I wanted my students to teach. I revealed the additional steps as we proceed through the lesson.

    The following is an excerpt from the lesson…

    Teacher: Mirror With Words (MWW)
    An expository essay has five parts (I hold up five fingers)

    Class mirrored what I said and did
    We did this several times

    Teacher: Class
    Class: Yes

    Next, I projected the second part of the lesson

    Teacher: (MWW)
    An expository essay has five parts … introduction with three reasons. (I hold up three fingers)

    Class mirrored what I said and did several times

    Teacher: Classity class
    Class: Yessity yes

    Teacher: When I give the signal you will teach your partner the same material
    (My class is ESE and Tier III students, so I have to give a start signal after I wait five seconds to allow the children process time.)

    Teacher: Ready, teach
    Class: Okay, teaching

    The students taught the material switching roles as I said switch. I watched and listened as students taught the lesson, correcting anyone who was not teaching correctly.

    Teacher: Oh most wonderful teaching and learning class…
    Class: Oh most wonderful teaching and learning yes…

    Teacher: Time for the next part MWW

    Teacher: An expository essay has five parts … an introduction with three reasons, transition word, first reason, detail, detail, detail, one time
    We MWW several times

    Teacher:
    Most perfect class…
    Class:
    Most perfect yes…

    Teacher: Ready, teach
    Class: Okay, teaching

    The students teach each other using the words and motions I have modeled

    I repeated the process using Teach-Okay for each part of the essay. While the students were teaching, I walked around the room making corrections and providing positive feedback to the students.

    This is not a fast lesson; I invested an instructional hour into the memorization of the components of an expository essay. My students can tell you what goes into each paragraph of the essay. When the students conference with one another, I hear them using the language from this lesson. For example, a student will read an essay and tell the other student you did not put in a transition word or a one time. The investment in this lesson has produced awesome results. Even Florida DOE was impressed with the language the students used when conferencing.

    We continued this process inserting a Teach-Okay after each step until we had memorized all the parts of an expository essay. The lesson ended with…..

    Teacher: Classssss
    Class: Yesssss

    You are the best teachers in our school. I am so proud to be associated with this class. Followed by an air high five…

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carrie Wood
      Chapters 8-10
      Teach-Okay

      Lesson: Introducing Letter “Ss” and its sound
      Setting: Kindergarten Classroom, Whole Group Instruction

      Teacher: Class! Class!
      Class: Yes! Yes!

      Teacher: Today we are going to learn about capital and lowercase Ss and the sound it makes. (Hold up letter card and trace letter.) Teacher traces letter in air and says, “This is the letter S.” Teach!

      Students: Okay! (Students turn to their partners and teach what the teacher just said using big hand gestures.)

      Teacher: Classity, Class!
      Students: Yessity, Yes!

      Teacher: This is the letter S in sign language (show students with hand) and it makes the sssss sound. Teach!

      Students: Okay! (Students turn to their neighbor and teach what the teacher just said using big hand gestures.)

      Teacher: Class, Class (in a deep voice)
      Students: Yes, Yes (in a deep voice)

      Teacher: Now we are going to come up with some words that begin with S. (Students raise hands and give examples.) Wonderful, now I want you to turn to your partner and come up with as many S words as you can. Teach!

      Students: Okay! (Students turn to their partners and brainstorm S words.

      Delete
    2. Carrie,
      Good teach-okay lesson! Thank you for the clarifying statement about the pace of the lesson. That was very helpful. Here are your 25 certification points!

      Delete
    3. Dian,
      Nice job! Essays are not easy to teach, and this sounds like a great plan! Watch out for those minor editing errors "I cannot possible teach" (possibly). Here are 20 certification points! (Save your posts in a word document to submit later).

      Delete
  24. Speech Therapy Lesson with 1st grade students on the phoneme /s/.

    Teacher: Classity Class!

    Students: Yessity Yes!

    Teacher: This is the letter /s/ and it makes the “ssss” sound. I like to call this sound the “tooth cooler” because we blow air through our teeth to make this sound. To say the /s/ sound correctly, we bit down, our top and bottom teeth touch, and we blow air gently through our front teeth. Class!

    Students: yes!

    Teacher: Describe to your partner how to correctly make the /s/ sound. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Class class!

    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: Sometimes when you say the /s/ sound your tongue sticks out and it makes the /th/ sound instead. It’s important to keep your tongue inside of your mouth and behind your teeth. Turn to your partner and explain where your tongue should be when saying the /s/ sound. Teach teach!

    Students: Okay! Okay!

    Teacher: Oh class!

    Students: Oh yes!

    Teacher: In front of you are ten picture cards with words beginning with the /s/ sound. Turn to your partner and say each one out loud using your strong /s/. Teach teach teach!

    Students: Okay okay okay!


    Michelle Fernandez

    ReplyDelete
  25. Michelle,
    Good attempt at a teach-okay lesson! You want to really chunk down your teaching to almost 1 sentence at a time. This will make it "stick" better in your student's brains. Here are your 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Anne Corrigan
    Teach-Okay
    3rd grade vocabulary lesson for weekly story.

    When I say the vocabulary word I” “frame” it in my hands. Then I do the gesture for the definition. For example “ _____________means “ , then I hold both hands up with thumbs to each other and index fingers pointing up. I do this for every vocab word and students frame the words as well when they repeat.

    Teacher: Class oh class
    Students: Yes oh yes
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn vocabulary words for “ The Great Invention” and you will use lots of big gestures. ( move arms and body excitedly around)
    Teach
    Students: Okay (Students turn to partner and repeat with gestures.)
    Teacher: Classity, classity class!
    Students: Yessity, yessity yes!
    Teacher: Examine means to look at something very closely (hold pretend magnifying glass moving it back and forth)
    Snapping fingers – (snap, snap, clap,) Teach!
    Students: snapping fingers- (snap ,snap ,clap ) Okay! (students will repeat definition with gestures)
    Teacher: (whispering) Oh class
    Students: (whispering) Oh yes
    Teacher: Investigation means when people search carefully for something (put hand over brow and pretend to search by moving head back and forth) (snap, snap clap) Teach!
    Students:( snap, snap, clap) Okay! (students repeat definition and gesture with partner)
    Teacher – Class, class, class
    Students: Yes, yes, yes
    Teacher: Encouraged means you are given hope to do something ( hands on heart then hands wide open to class) (snap, snap, clap ) Teach!
    Students: (snap, snap, clap) Okay! (students repeat definition and gesture)


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne,
      Nice job of chunking your lesson. I would love to see how you extend this into the 5 Step Lesson Template! Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  27. Teacher: Class, Class, Class?
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Yesterday we used a strategy to help us answer a very important question.
    Ask your partner, what question did we answer yesterday?
    Teacher: Teach (clap).
    Student: Ok (clap).
    Teacher: Class?
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Raise your hand to remind all of us what our questions was yesterday
    ….
    Teacher: Right! We asked, how do scientists classify living things?
    Ask your partner, what was the name of the reading strategy we used to find our answer to our question, how do scientists classify living things?
    Teacher: Teach (clap, clap)
    Students: Ok (clap, clap)
    Teacher: Class, Class, Class?
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Raise your hand to remind all of us of the name of the reading strategy we used to find an answer to our question, how do scientists classify living things?
    ….

    Teacher: Yes! We used Read-Decide-Explain
    Ten finger woo.
    Teacher: Mirror Words.
    Students: Mirror Words.
    Teacher: with gesture-Yesterday we used Read-Decide-Explain (gesture) to help us answer our question, how do scientists classify living things (gesture).
    Teacher: Teach (clap, clap, clap).
    Students: Ok ( clap, clap, clap).

    Teacher: Class
    Student: Yes
    Teacher: Ask your partner, what are some of the steps scientist take to classify living things?
    Teacher: Teach (clap)
    Students: Ok (clap).
    Teacher: Class?
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Raise your hand to remind all us of one of the steps scientist follow to classify living thing. Use your gestures.

    Teacher: Yes, they follow a process. Teach
    Students: Ok

    Teacher: Yes, they observe and study physical characteristics, internal structures and how cells work. Teach
    Students: Ok

    Teacher: Yes, after they make these observations, they put the organisms into groups. Teach
    Students: OK

    Teacher: Mirror Words,
    Students: Mirror Words,
    Teacher: When scientist classify living things (pause) students repeat
    They follow a process (pause) students repeat
    They observe and study the organism’s physical appearance, internal structures and how its cells work. (pause) students repeat
    After these observations, they put the organisms into groups students repeat

    Teacher: Teach
    Students: Ok

    Teacher: Class? Class? Class?
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Caroline, for the class, please answer the question, how do scientists classify living things?
    Caroline: Claaaaaaaaaaaaaas
    Class: Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeees
    Caroline: Mirror Words
    Students: Mirror Words
    ….
    Rebecca Murphy
    www.wbteaching.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rebecca,
      Great lesson! You could even add some Teach Ok/Switch in there too to change it up a little bit. You broke the steps down nicely and I'm sure they will really retain the information! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Lesson on Reading Fluently: Second Grade

    Teacher: Class gobble!

    Students: Yes gobble!

    Teacher: Today we are going to learn 3 ways to help us read fluently (make hands into a book and wave hands like water).
    Ask your partner: What does it mean to read fluently? (Raise shoulders like asking a question and repeat gesture above).

    Clap hands twice: Teach!

    Students: (Clap hands twice.) Okay! Students discuss what it means to read fluently with partner using gestures.

    Teacher: Ahh..class?

    Students: Ahh…yes?

    Teacher: One way to read fluently is to pay attention to your rate (gesture number 1 with finger and repeat gesture above). How fast you read (move arms by your side like you are running) and how slow you read (slowly move arms back and forth).

    John Travolta move: Teach!

    Students: (John Travolta move) Okay! Students teach the first way to read fluently with gestures.

    Teacher: Class’um.

    Students: Yes’um.

    Teacher: If you read something spooky you will want to read it slowly. If you are reading something exciting you will want to read fast! A second way to read fluently (use book gesture above) is phrasing. Putting words together (clasp hands together) that sound right (cup hand to ear).

    Pat hands on lap twice: Teach

    Students: (Pat hands on lap twice.) Okay! Students teach the second way to read fluently with gestures.

    Teacher: Some words sound like they go together, like spaghetti and meatballs or peanut butter and jelly. We want to put those words together to sound smooth. A third way to read fluently (use reading gesture) is intonation (clap hands together straight out in front of you). Putting emphasis (clap hands again) on words that look different (put hand up to forehead as if looking for something).

    Cha Cha hands: Teach!

    Students: (Cha cha hands.) Okay! Students teach the third way to read fluently with gestures.

    Teacher: Class-a doodle Doo!

    Students: Yes-A-Doodle-Doo!

    Teacher: There are three ways to read fluently. Rate: (how fast or how slow you read), phrasing (putting words together that sound right), and intonation (putting emphasis on words that look different). (Use gestures for each.) When I say teach, number one students will teach all 3 ways first. Use gestures. Number Two students will use listening gestures please. Listen for me to say SWITCH!

    Clap hands 3 times over head: Teach!

    Students: (Clap hands over head 3 times.) Okay! (Student number one teaches three ways to read fluently with gestures. Student number two uses listening gestures.)

    Teacher: SWITCH!

    Students: (Swap roles.)

    I would finish this lesson with a choral read where we use all three techniques to read fluently. We would teach and switch again at the end of the lesson.

    Suzanne St. Laurent

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Suzanne,
      Nice job of chunking your lesson! I appreciate the level of academic language you are using in your lessons! Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  30. Science Lesson: Energy
    (My class is already familiar with all of the methods I use during this lesson, so it is not necessary to introduce any of them. This is the actual introductory lesson I used for Chapter 6 in our Science book.)

    Teacher: Classy, class!

    Students: Yessy, yes!

    Teacher: Today’s lesson is about ENERGY! There are MANY different types of energy! With the most energetic voice possible, teach your “across” partner what today’s lesson is about! TEACH, TEACH, TEACH!

    Students: OKAY, OKAY, OKAY! Today’s lesson is about ENERGY! There are MANY different types of ENERGY!

    Teacher: Give yourselves a Mighty Oh Yeah that was suuuuuuper Energetic!!

    Students: Oh Yeah!

    Teacher: Bodies and chairs

    Students: Bodies and chairs, bodies and chairs, bodies and chairs
    (This is the cue I use for my students to stand up, push their chairs in, and stand up quietly behind their desks.)

    Teacher: Mirrors with words (make gesture)

    Students: Mirrors with words (make gesture)

    Teacher: Energy is the ability to do work or cause a change. (Making the gestures that go along with the definition of energy)

    Students: Energy is the ability to do work or cause a change. (Making the gestures that go along with the definition of energy)

    (Repeat this 3x)

    Teacher: Mirrors off

    Students: Mirrors off

    Teacher: Teach your shoulder partner what I just taught you about ENERGY! 1s and 4s go first! (Clap, clap, clap, Teach!)

    Students: Clap, clap, clap, Okay! Students turn to their shoulder partner and teach them the definition of energy using the gestures I taught them. They will continue teaching each other until…

    Teacher: Uh-oh, switch! (Making gesture)

    Students: Uh-oh, switch! (Making gesture) The 2s and 3s will teach their shoulder partner the definition using the gestures I taught them. They will continue teaching until...

    Teacher: Oh ENERGETIC, class!

    Students: Oh ENERGETIC, yes!

    Teacher: Teach ME what you have learned so far about energy! Teeee-eee-eeeach!

    Students: Okaaa-aaa-aaayyy! As a whole group, students will teach me the definition of energy using the gestures I taught them.

    We will continue this process for the different types of energy included in the lesson: mechanical, kinetic, potential, and chemical. Students will use the teach-okay method to teach their “shoulder” or “across” partner the definitions of each of these types of energy.

    Meghan Holliday

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Meghan,
      Very good job incorporating WBT into your subject review. I would enjoy seeing your lesson on compare and contrast of these types of energy. Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  31. Teacher: Class-a-roni!
    Students: Yes-a-roni!
    Teacher: Hands and Eyes! Mirror! (teacher acts out words while students mimic these gestures) We have been learning about multiplication. Clap hands twice: Teach!
    Students clap twice: Ok!
    Teacher: Classity!
    Students: Yessity!
    Teacher: Today, we will answer this question: What are the properties of multiplication? Teach!
    Students: Ok!
    Teacher: Properties are rules. (On 'rules,' shake finger like you're instructing) Teach!
    Students: Ok!
    Teacher: The commutative property says it's ok to switch factors. Mirror! The commutative property says its ok (make ok sign with fingers) to switch (hold up hands, then cross) factors. Teach!
    Students: Ok!
    Teacher: For example, 6x3 is the same as 3x6. This is the commutative property. Commutative- switch! Commutative- switch! (Snap twice) Teach!
    Students: (Snap twice) Ok!
    Teacher: Hey, class!
    Students: Hey, yes!
    Teacher: The IDENTITY property is like looking in a mirror. (hold up hands like looking in a mirror). When you multiply by ONE (hold up a number one) the other factor stays the same. (Clap hands twice) Teach!
    Students: (Clap hands twice) Ok!
    Teacher: Classity!
    Students: Yessity!
    Teacher: For example, 6x1=6 is the identity property because we multiply by 1! (hold up numbers and multiplication sign) Te---ach!
    Students: Ooo--k!
    Teacher: CLASS!
    Students: YES!
    Teacher: Let's review. The commutative property switches factors. (use commutative gesture) The identity property multiplies by one. (hold up one and a mirror) TEACH!
    Students: OK!
    Teacher: Class class class class!
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: We have one more to learn! The ZERO property! Ooo yeah! (Snap twice) Teach!
    Students: (Snap twice) Ok!
    Teacher: The zero in the zero property is like a black hole. It sucks all the factors in and leaves NOTHING! TEACH!
    Students: OK!
    Teacher: For example, 4x0=0. 4,000x0 is also 0! 400,000x0 is 0! TEACH!
    Students: OK!
    Teacher: What's up, class?
    Students: What's up, yes?
    Teacher: Now we know the commutative property (gesture), identity property (gesture), and the zero property (gesture) We're ready to practice! Teach!
    Students: Ok!
    Teacher: I will show you a multiplication problem and you will show me the gesture of the property. A one (gesture) for identity, a zero (gesture) for zero, and switch (gesture) for commutative! Teach!
    Students: Ok!

    At this point in the lesson, the teacher will show a list of multiplication problems that exemplify the multiplication properties. She will watch for students who cannot correctly match a problem with the property.

    Madeline Mahan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Madeline,
      Great gestures and use of several WBT strategies! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  32. Chapters 8-10 Teach-Okay

    Lesson: Third Grade Reading Vocabulary Introduction

    Teacher: Class Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: Today we are going to s-t-r-e-t-c-h (I draw out the word and model a stretching gesture with my hands.) our vocabulary (I gesture a giant letter “V” using my arms). (Clap Clap) Teach!
    Students: (Clap Clap) Okay! (Students teach each other what I’ve said and mirror my gestures.)

    Teacher: Oh, Claaaa-aaaaass! (In a sweet, sing-song voice)
    Students: Oh, Yeeee-eeeess!

    Teacher: Say, “Oh, Sweet Mama, I’m excited to s-t-r-e-t-c-h my vocabulary!” (Wringing hands excitedly, spoken with gusto!)
    Students: “Oh, Sweet Mama, I’m excited to s-t-r-e-t-c-h my vocabulary!” (Students mirror teacher’s gestures.)

    Teacher: Remember, when I say “Teach,” you say, “Okay!” and turn toward your partner. Teach your partner, using gestures in an excited manner because this is exciting new information! Remember to continue teaching and gesturing excitedly until I say “Class!” (Clap Clap Stomp Stomp) Teach!
    Students: (Clap Clap Stomp Stomp) Okay! Students teach each other what I’ve just said gesturing excitedly.

    Teacher: Class?
    Students: Yes?

    Teacher: Very nice gesturing! (Mark a point on the smiley side of the scoreboard.) Wait for it—(Point to students.)
    Students: Clap- Oh Yeah! (Students’ hands are pointed toward the ceiling.)

    Teacher: Classy Class!
    Students: Yessy Yes!

    Teacher: When I say, “Teach,” the ones will be the teachers and the twos will be the listening learners. If you are a listening learner, remember to mirror the teacher’s gestures, and encourage the teacher to tell you more using non-verbal cues like a rolling motion with your hands. (Clap Clap Clap) TEEE-EACH!
    Students: (Clap Clap Clap) OHHH-KAAAYY! (Students teach and gesture what I’ve just shared.)

    Teacher: Classity Class!
    Students: Yessity Yes!

    Teacher: Remember, when I say, “Switch!” You will say, “Oh-oh, Switch!” You will high-five your partner, the twos will now be the teachers and the ones will be the listening learners. (Clap Clap Clap Clap) Teach!
    Students: (Clap Clap Clap Clap) Okay! (Students teach each other what I’ve shared using gestures.)

    Teacher: Class-a-doodle-doo!
    Students: Yes-a-doodle-doo!

    Teacher: First word: spoil (The vocabulary word, meaning, and illustration are on the SMART Board.) means to become bad or not good to eat. (I gesture, waving my hand in front of my nose with a frown for “bad,” and rub my tummy and shake my head for “not good to eat.) I repeat, and this time students mirror my words and actions. (Clap Clap Clap Stomp) Teach!
    Students: (Clap Clap Clap Stomp) Okay! (The ones teach and gesture the vocabulary word to their partner.)

    Teacher: Uh-Oh, SWITCH!
    Students: Uh-Oh, SWITCH! (Students high-five their partner and the twos teach the ones.)

    Teacher: Class-ito!
    Students: Yess-ito!

    Teacher: Nice job class! (Walk near the scoreboard.) Wait for it—(Make a mark on the smiley side of the scoreboard and point to class.)
    Students: Clap! Oh-Yeah!

    Teacher: I am so excited to see all of you gesturing and teaching with such enthusiasm! Give yourselves a ten-finger wooo!
    Students: “Wooo!”

    Please note: the vocabulary introduction continues in this manner for the remaining words.

    Jacqueline Nessuno

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jacqueline,
      Nice job breaking the lesson down and using several WBT strategies! Teaching in small chunks works wonders!! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  33. Grade Level: Middle School Math
    Content for instruction: Prime and Composite Numbers
    T: “Claaass!”
    S: “Yeees!”
    T: “Today, we are going to learn about prime and composite numbers! In our efforts to identify the factors and multiples of numbers, it is important to learn which numbers are prime (hand gesture holding up one finger) and which numbers are composite (hand gesture opening and closing hand multiple times). A prime number (hand gesture holding up one finger) is a number that can only be divided by itself and the number 1. Turn to your partners and teach what a prime number (hand gesture holding up one finger) is using the appropriate gesture. Clap, teach!”
    S: “Clap, okay!” Students turn to each other and begin talking about multiples and factors.
    T: “Ohhh, Class!”
    S: “Ohhh, Yes!”
    T: “Red light!”
    S: “Errr! Brakes!”
    T: “Let’s back up. A prime number (hand gesture holding up one finger) is a number that can only be divided by itself and the number 1. Turn to your partners and teach what a prime number (hand gesture holding up one finger) is using the appropriate gesture. Teachy Weach!”
    S: “Okayee, Way!” Students turn toward their partner and begin repeating information on prime numbers.
    T: “Classity, Class!”
    S: “Yessity, Yes!”
    T: “Very good! A prime number (hand gesture holding up one finger) is a number that can only be divided by itself and the number 1. A composite number (hand gesture opening and closing hand multiple times) is a number that can be divided into equal parts by numbers other than one or itself. You are going to turn to your partner and teach them about prime numbers (hand gesture holding up one finger) and composite numbers (hand gesture opening and closing hand multiple times) now using your hand gestures. Teach, teach!”
    S: “Okay, okay!” Students turn and teach about prime and composite numbers.
    T: Low voice: “Cla—aaasss!”
    S: Low voice: “Ye—eeesss!”
    T: “Good teaching!”

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amanda,
      Great lesson! You might even add in some "mirrors" and "switch" with your teach/okay so change it up a little bit. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  34. Me: Classity, Class, Class!
    Students: Yessity, Yes , Yes!
    Me: Today we are going to learn the answer to the question, “What is addition?” Please make a full turn to your partner and ask them, “What is addition?”
    (Clap, Clap) Teach!
    (Clap, Clap) Okay!
    [I usually get down on my knees and join my kiddos on the carpet while they share so I can really get in and listen to their conversations]
    Me: (In a whisper) cllaaassss
    Students: (in a whisper) yeeessss
    Me: Addition (makes addition sign with arms) is when you take two parts (both hands out to the side) and you put them together (clap them together) to get a whole.
    (In a sing-songy voice) TeEeAaAcChH!
    Students: (In the same sing-songy voice) YeEeEeSs!
    [Students turn and use the same gestures and words to talk to their partners. I get on the floor and crawl around them to observe and help as necessary.]
    Me: (To the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat) Class, Class, Class Class Class!
    Students: Yes, Yes, Yes Yes Yes!
    Me: Nice job showing your partners how Addition is taking two parts and putting them together to make a whole (mimicking the same motions as before with the addition sign and then the two hands out to the side, clapping when I put them together to get the whole.)
    Let me show you now with some numbers. Two (hold up two fingers) Plus (make addition sign by crossing both arms) Two (hold up two fingers again but in the opposite hand) Equals (push both hands with two fingers held up on each together) Four (count all the fingers wiggling each as you count) 1-2-3-4.
    (In a high pitched fast voice while throwing hands in the air) TEACH!
    Students: (In a high pitched fast voice while throwing hands in the air) OKAY!
    Me: Classssssss!
    Students: Yeessssss!
    Me: You are great at adding those two parts together! Now I will show you why 2+2=4! 2 is one part (hold up two fingers on left hand) the other 2 is the second part (hold up 2 on the opposite hand) when I add them together (put both sets of two next to each other) I get 4 whole fingers!
    Me: Clap, Clap, Teach!
    Students: Clap, Clap, Okay!
    Me: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Me: Now I want to know what happens when one part is 2 (hold up two fingers on right hand) and the other part is 3 (hold up three fingers on left hand!) Turn and tell your partner what happens when I add (push the two sets of fingers together) these two parts together!
    Teach!
    Students: Okay!

    Candice Phipps

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Candice,
      Nice job. You can even throw in some "mirrors" and a "switch" during the teach/okay portions to give them more repetition (build those dendrites!). Here are 25 certification points.

      Delete
  35. 4th grade math
    T: Class
    S: Yes
    T: (with excited voice and gestures) Today, we are going to learn how to do something new. (sweeping hands overhead while saying something new) Turn to your partner and tell him/her how excited you are to learn something new.
    Students follow teacher's directions.
    T: Claaass!
    S: Yeess!
    T: Today, we are going to learn how to simplify fractions! (spoken in a whispered voice, emphasizing the words simplify fractions) Now, rub your hands together and with your best evil scientist laugh, tell your partner how you can’t wait to simplify fractions! Ha-ha-ha-ha!
    S: (with their best evil scientist imitation & laughter) Ha-ha-ha-ha! I can’t wait to simplify fractions!
    T: (with low and slow evil scientist voice) Ohh claass!
    S: (mimic teacher’s voice) Ohh yeess!
    T: Simplify has the root word simple in it. (I would write the word “simplify” on the board and underline the root word.) Simple means easy. Say it with me.
    T & S:(enthusiastically) Simple means easy!
    T: Again, with even more excitement!
    S: (loud & excited) SIMPLE MEANS EASY!
    T: Tell your partner about this new word and what it means. (clap twice) Teeeach!
    S: (clap twice) Ooookay! (students teach their partner about the word simplify)
    T: Yoo hoo, class!
    S: Yoo hoo, yes!
    T: Look at your partner and (Sweeping hand across forehead with relief) say “Whew, simple means easy.” Students follow teachers gestures and directions.

    T: Get ready, class!
    S: I’m ready, yes!
    T: Mirror words (said with hand gestures)(learned this way in Biffle’s workshop)
    S: Mirror words (students mimic words and gestures of teacher)
    T: To simplify (hold hands spread out and then bring them close together to show going from bigger to smaller)
    S: To simplify (students mimic words and gestures)
    T: Means to reduce or make smaller (hold hands out flat and push down)
    S: Means to reduce or make smaller (students mimic words and gestures)
    Repeat with students.
    T: (clap twice) Teach!
    S: (clap twice) Okay! (students teach their partner)

    T: Hands and eyes.
    S: Hands and eyes (students clasp hands together quickly and look at teacher).

    T: Now, you know that when we simplify a fraction, we are going to make it smaller. We do this because when it’s smaller(use hand gestures showing something getting smaller), it is simple and (use gestures like mashing Play Dough between hands) EEEAASYYYY to work with. Give me an “Oh, Yeah!” if you like easy math!
    S: (loud and excited) Oh, Yeah!
    T: I want you to explain to your partner why we simplify fractions. (clap twice) Teach!
    S: (clap twice) Okay! (students teach this to their partner)
    T: Let’s go, class, class!
    S: Let’s go, yes, yes!
    T: When we simplify a fraction, we have to divide the fraction by a common factor that the numerator and the denominator share. I know this sounds like a lot, but I’m going to show you the EASY way to do this. Now, rub your hands together and say, Oh, sweet mama! She’s going to show us the EASY way!
    S: (rubbing hands together & smiling) Oh, sweet mama! She’s going to show us the EASY way!
    T: (enthusiastically) All we have to do is list the factors of the numerator and the denominator! (We’ve already done this, a lot.) Listing factors is SO EASY! Tell your partner how easy it is to list factors.
    S: (excitedly) Listing factors is so EASY!
    T: This is what we are going to do. We are going to get out our whiteboards and write the fraction 2/8. Then, we will list the factors of 2 and the factors of 8. Finally, we will circle the common factors. You got this, class?!
    S: We got this, yes!
    T: Tell your partner what we are going to do today. (clap twice) “Teach!”
    S: (clap twice) Okay! (students teach their partner what we are going to do)
    T: Classity, class!
    S: Yessity, yes!
    T: Now that you know how easy our lesson is going to be, I want you to get out your white boards and list your factors of 2 and 8.
    (Students then get their white boards out and follow my directions. I circulate around the room to help anyone who needs help.)

    Jackie Rabin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jackie,
      Great job! You included mirrors and several teach/okay moments! You could also add in "switch" to make sure they each have some time to teach the other person individually. I love your enthusiasm-it shines through your lesson! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  36. Me: Classity class!
    Students: Yessity yes!
    Me: Mirrors with words. (holding up hands)
    Students: Mirror with words. (holding up hands)
    Me: Today is a Red Fish day. All day, the Red fish partner will speak first.
    Students: (repeat) Today is a Red Fish day. All day, the Red fish partner will speak first.
    Me: Bugs are not the same as insects. Insects have a set of specific characteristics. Teach!!
    Students: Ok! (students teach their partner what was just said. When they say “not” they shake their heads no and wave their index finger).
    Me: Oh class!
    Students: Oh Yes!
    Me: To be considered an insect the creature must have 6 legs (wiggle fingers near ribs) 3 body parts (point to head, belly, and legs). Sometimes they also have wings (flap arms) and antennae (put pointer fingers on head and wiggle). Teach!
    Students: Ok! (students teach their partner what I just said and they mimic the gestures.)
    Me: Knock, Knock!
    Students: Who’s there!
    Me: Great teaching! (mark a tally on the scoreboard)
    Students: Oh Yeah!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nichole,
      This is a good start, you may want to break down your concepts even more though. For example, divide "Bugs are not the same as insects. Insects have a set of specific characteristics" into two separate Teach/okays, and the "...6 legs, wings, antennae" segment into 3 separate sets of info. That just provides more time for repetition/listening/teaching! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  37. Teach-OK dialogue for 5th grade ESOL lesson
    Teacher: Class
    Students: Yes
    Teacher: Mirror Words
    Students: Mirror Words
    Teacher: What are you good at? (Repeat 3x demonstrating proper gestures, pronunciation and intonation)
    Students: What are you good at? (Repeat 3x practicing gestures, pronunciation and intonation)
    Teacher: Practice with your partner. Teach!
    Students: Ok! What are you good at? (students repeat the question over and over, teacher walks around the room prompting or praising)
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Switch! What are you good at? (students repeat over and over, teacher walks around the room prompting or praising)
    Teacher: Class
    Students: Yes
    Teacher: Mirror Words.
    Students: Mirror words.
    Teacher: What are you good at? I´m good at dancing. (Repeat 3x demonstrating proper gestures, pronunciation and intonation)
    Students: What are you good at? I´m good at dancing. (Repeat 3x practicing gestures, pronunciation and intonation)
    Teacher: Practice with your partner. Teach!
    Students: OK! (Students repeat the dialogue, teacher walks around the room prompting or praising)
    Teacher: Switch! (students switch and repeat dialogue)
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Can you think of an example? I´m good at… (students raise their hands and suggest playing football, running, playing video games…) Let´s practice with a partner and use our own examples. Teach.
    Students: Ok. (students repeat the dialogue inserting their own answers, teacher walks around the room prompting or praising)
    Teacher: Switch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adrienne,
      Great job including the teach/okay, switch and mirror words! I appreciated the positive element in your lesson (having them find things that affirm themselves!). Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  38. 1st grade
    Addends/ Sum

    Teacher: Classy class?
    Class: Yessy yes!
    Teacher: Okay, today we are going to meet two new math friends, their names are addends and sum (hands apart for addends and pressed together for sum). Go ahead and peanut butters tell your jellies about our new friends. (clap clap teach!)
    Class: (clap clap okay!)
    Teacher: Dear class?
    Class: Dear yes!
    Teacher: SWITCH! Jellies tell your peanut butters about our new friends!
    Teacher: Hi ho class?
    Class: Hi ho yes!
    Teacher: Addends are numbers that you add together to get the answer! (starting with hands apart, and then pressing them together). I want jellies to teach their peanut butters what addends are. (clap clap teach)
    Class: (clap clap okay)
    Teacher: OH CLAAAAASSS
    Class: OH YESSSSS
    Teacher: Switch! Peanut butters now teach your jellies!
    Teacher: (with an english accent) OY CLASS?
    Class: OY YES!
    Teacher: Who was our other friend? Oh yes, “sum”! Sum is just a fancy word for the answer! (holding pinkie up in the air) I want peanut butters to teach jellies what a sum is. (clap clap teach)
    Class: (clap clap okay!)
    Teacher: C..L..A..S..S
    Class: Y E S
    Teacher: Switch! I want jellies to teach peanut butters! (clap clap teach)
    Class: (clap clap okay)
    Teacher: HEY HO CLASS-O
    Class: HEY HO YES-O
    Teacher: Okay now let’s put it all together. Addends are two numbers that you add together to get the sum! (hands apart, to together, to the pinkie gesture). Jellies, you teach first! (clap clap teach)
    Class: (clap clap okay)
    Teacher: Class switch!
    Class: Yes switch!
    (peanut butters will then teach jellies)
    Teacher: Classity class!
    Class: Yessity yes!
    Teacher: I want you guys to teach ME what addends and the sum are all together!
    Class: Addends are two numbers that you add together to get the sum! (hands apart, to together, to the pinkie gesture).
    Teacher: Excellent! Now lets go practice putting addends together to create sums!
    At this point, students will break into hands on centers to further review and practice addition skills!

    ReplyDelete
  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Caroline,
    Great post! I can feel the positive energy through your writing. I like your use of peanut butters and jellies! Do you have the students pull down their mighty levers when you say switch? It is a fun way to add a visual cues as well as the sound. Here are your 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  41. Teacher: Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!
    Teacher: Today, we are going to learn about producers and consumers. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students repeat what the teacher says).
    Teacher: A producer is someone who makes or grows things to sell; or has a service to sell. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students repeat what the teacher says).
    Teacher: Two examples of a producer is a doctor who performs a service and a farmer who sells food. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students repeat what the teacher says).


    Mary Carlson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary,
      Great topic! You may want to add in some more Class/Yes and add a "Mirror/Words" and a little more detail and repetition for them to really get the concept. Here are 20 certification points.

      Delete
  42. Grade 1 Nouns

    Teacher: Class?
    Students: Yes?
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about nouns. Turn to your partner and ask, “What is a noun?” Don’t forget to use gestures. (Teacher claps hands twice) Teach.
    Students: (Clap hands twice) OK. Students ask their partners what nouns are while using gestures.
    Teacher: Class, class?
    Students: Yes, yes
    Teacher: A noun names a person, place or thing. (Twirls arm overhead like getting ready to throw a lariat) Teach.
    Students: (Mimic gesture) OK. Students repeat what the teacher has said.
    Teacher: Class, class, class?
    Students: Yes, yes, yes.
    Teacher: Mirrors.
    Students: Mirrors.
    Teacher: Mirrors, with words.
    Students: Mirrors with words.
    Teacher: A word that names a person is a noun.
    Students: A word that names a person is a noun.
    Teacher: The gesture for this is pointing to yourself.
    Students: The gesture for this is pointing to yourself.
    Teacher: A word that names a person is a noun. The gesture for this is pointing to yourself. (Claps three times and waves them like an umpire calling ‘safe’) Teach.
    Students: (Mimic gesture) OK. Students repeat what they have just mirrored.
    Teacher: Classity, class?
    Students: Yessity yes?
    Teacher: Now I want the “Bunnies” to teach the “Eggs” what they know so far about nouns. (Pulls pretend bell cord) Teach.
    Students: (Mimic gesture) OK.
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: (High- five each other) Switch! (Now the “Eggs” teach the “Bunnies”.)
    Teacher: Classaroony?
    Students: Yesaroony?
    Teacher: Mirrors.
    Students: Mirrors.
    Teacher: Mirrors, with words.
    Students: Mirrors with words.
    Teacher: A word that names a place is a noun.
    Students: A word that names a place is a noun.
    Teacher: The gesture for this is to wave your hands around from side to side.
    Students: The gesture for this is to wave your hands around from side to side.

    Teacher: A word that names a place is a noun. The gesture is to wave your hands around from side to side.
    Students: A word that names a place is a noun. The gesture is to wave your hands around from side to side.
    Teacher: “Eggs” teach the “Bunnies” what you know so far about nouns. (Claps once) Teach.
    Students: (Clap once) OK. (“Eggs” teach “Bunnies”.)
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: (High- five each other) Switch! (Now “Bunnies” teach the “Eggs”.)
    The lesson would continue with a word that names a thing using the gesture of tapping a desk or other object that is readily available. At the end of this I would review what a noun is again and have the class teach their partners using gestures. The next day we would review what we learned so far and delve into a more comprehensive lesson on nouns that name people. The other kinds of nouns would be discussed in future lessons.
    Liz Howard

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Liz,
      What a fun lesson! I love the Bunnies and Eggs! Super job! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  43. Thanks Michelle! I have my kids sit in 4 rows on the rug. The first row this month is a Bunny row , the next is an Eggs row then Bunnies then Eggs. It works great for telling the class who will Teach first. I use it for SuperSpeed Math also! We'll come up with another name for the month of May.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Chapters 8 - 10

    Teacher: Class Class!
    Students: Yes Yes!
    T: (big eyes and lots of enthusiasm) Today we are going to learn something really exciting about plants! Turn to your neighbour and tell them how excited you are to learn something new. (clap hands twice) Teach!
    S: (clap twice) Okay! (students turn and tell their neighbour how excited they are. They high five to switch and the other partner talks)
    T: O-class-o!
    S: O-yes-o!
    T: Plants need 3 (holding up 3 fingers) things to live. Mirrors with Words! (hands up at sides).
    S: Mirrors with words (hands up at sides).
    T: Plants need 3 (holding up 3 fingers) things to live.
    S: Plants need 3 (holding up 3 fingers) things to live.
    T: Tell your neighbour that plants need 3 (emphasized and holding up 3 fingers) things to live. (stamp stamp)Teach!
    S: (stamp stamp) Okay! (Students take turns telling their neighbour that plants need 3 things to live. They do the high-five switch).
    T: Class-a-roonie!
    S: Yes – a –roonie!
    T: Now you know that plants need 3 (3 fingers lifted and emphasized). But what are they? (huh gesture – elbows up and hands out).
    S: (students look around and do ‘huh’ gesture).
    T: Well, hold onto your hats, because I am going to tell you! (giggles) The first thing (holding up one finger) plants need to live is sunlight (make a big circle with arms overhead). Using gestures, tell your neighbour the first thing plants need to live. (snap snap) Teach!
    S: (snap snap) Okay! (students take turn telling each other what plants need).
    Teacher circulates room and praises students switching and gesturing; prompts those not gesturing or switching.
    T: Classlight!
    S: Yeslight!
    T: Now we know that plants need sunlight to live. There are 2 more things. Get ready,,,hold your seats...the second thing is....water (flutter fingers down through the air). Plants need sunlight and water to live. Tell that information to your neighbour. Remember to do your high-five switch. (flutter fingers) Teach!
    S: (flutter fingers) Okay! (students turn and teach each other).
    T: Classity Class Class!
    S: Yessity Yes Yes!
    T: Now we know 2 (fingers up) things plants need to live. The last thing plants need to live is...drumroll please (students do drumroll)...is food! (hand to mouth gesture). Plants need 3 (emphasized and 3 fingers up) things to live. (1 finger up) Sunlight (arms around head), (2 fingers up) water (flutter fingers down), and (3 fingers up) food (hand to mouth). Plants need 3 (emphasized and 3 fingers up) things to live. (1 finger up) Sunlight (arms around head), (2 fingers up) water (flutter fingers down), and (3 fingers up) food (hand to mouth). Mirrors with Words (arms up at sides).
    S: Mirrors with Words (arms up at sides).
    T: Plants need 3 (emphasized and 3 fingers up) things to live. (1 finger up) Sunlight (arms around head), (2 fingers up) water (flutter fingers down), and (3 fingers up) food (hand to mouth).
    S: Plants need 3 (emphasized and 3 fingers up) things to live. (1 finger up) Sunlight (arms around head), (2 fingers up) water (flutter fingers down), and (3 fingers up) food (hand to mouth).
    T: Now I want you to tell your neighbour the 3 things plants need to live, using big gestures and words. (clap and ‘ta-da’ pose) Teach!
    S: (clap and ‘ta-da’ pose) Okay! (students turn and teach).
    Teacher circulates room and picks a pair of students doing Teach Okay well.
    T: Claaasss!
    S: Yeeeesss!
    T: I would like you to watch Hope and Emily teach each other.
    Hope and Emily do the teaching with gestures and switch.
    T: Great job girls! Did you notice their big gestures and the high-five switch? Let’s give them a 10 finger woo!
    S: Woooooo! (waving fingers towards the girls)
    T: Ok, continue teaching with your partner.
    S: Ok. (they continue on)

    Bonnie Marin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bonnie,
      Super job! You did a nice job integrating several WBT techniques. The repetition and element of fun will help them really understand this concept! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  45. CHAPTERS 8-10 ASSIGNMENT: Teach-Okay

    One of my favorite lessons is teaching 2nd grade their first lesson in musical form. I use the folk song “Lazy Bones” to demonstrate to the students that musical phrases help shape its form. The following is a dialogue of how I would use “Teach Ok!” to turn up a section within my 5 step lesson plan.

    Part#2 – Answer the Question
    Teacher: Class Class Class-Class Class
    Students: Yes Yes Yes-Yes Yes
    Teacher: When music is divided into parts, it is called form. TEACH
    Students: Ok!
    (Students proceed to teach the each other the meaning of form)

    Part #3 – Give Examples
    Teachers: Classsssy Class Class
    Students: Yessssy Yes Yes
    Teacher: Lets sing an example of form
    Teacher: Mirror Words
    Class: Mirror Words
    Teacher: Part #1 is
    Class: Part #1 is
    Teacher: Sing Part#1
    Students: Sing part #1
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Ok!
    (Students are now practicing using their singing voices, the part of the song reinforcing the vocals of the song)
    Teacher: Class Class
    Students: Yes Yes
    Teacher: Sing for me the part we just practiced using perfect signing voices.
    Class: Nails the song the first time!
    Teacher: Good singing is worthy of a point. Give me a hoohaa!
    Class: hoohaa.
    (The class repeats this process with part #2 of the song)



    A huge part of music education is the teaching of proper vocal technique. It is the first of the National Association for Music Educations National Standards. Sing alone and with others a variety of music. With teach ok, my students are practicing singing like they never had before. The structure allows for instant student practice and repetition in a fun way. My students are no longer afraid to sing by themselves, teach ok provides a comfort zone for them.
    -Jason Thomashefsky

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jason,
      How wonderful to hear that using teach/okay provides a comfort zone for your students! That will provide a freedom that produces so much more learning! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  46. Mrs. Brown: Class, Class
    Students: Yes, Yes
    Teacher: Vocabulary, Vocabulary!
    Class: Vocabulary, Vocabulary!
    Mrs. Brown: We have five new vocabulary words and definitions that go with our reading lesson this week. I will read the words and definitions to you and I want you to teach each one to your partner after I read them to you. (Teacher reads each vocabulary word with the definitions, one at a time) Teach!
    Class: Okay (students repeat each vocabulary word and definition to their partners after the teacher has read each one.)
    Mrs. Brown: Class, Class (clap, clap)
    Class: Yes, Yes (clap, clap)
    Teacher: Vocabulary, Vocabulary!
    Class: Vocabulary, Vocabulary!
    Irish Brown

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Irish,
      Vocabulary is an excellent choice! You may want to break down your instructions into smaller chunks. The section after "vocabulary, vocabulary" could be divided into individual statements. For example, We have 5 new vocab. words and definitions that go with our reading this week. (teach/okay or mirror/words). I will read the words and definitions to you and I want you to teach each one to your partner after I read them to you (teach/okay or mirror words). Then, do the 1st vocab word/definition and teach/okay. As you do the 2nd word, have them review the 1st one too. Then, adding the 3rd word, they will review #1 and #2 etc. Repetition builds dendrites!! Here are 20 certification points!

      Delete
  47. Chapters 8-10: Teach-Okay

    Teacher: Class! Class!

    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: In a second I am going to have you teach your elbow partner the rules to the math concept order of operation. I want you to use both words and big gestures you have learned. I want the students on the left side of the row to be the first to listen and the one on the right side to teach. Then, when I say “Switch!” I want all of your to say “Switch!” and the person on the right side of the rows will then be the listener and the left side person will teach.

    Teacher: Left side teach the right side order of operation. Keep teaching the rules over and over again until I say, Switch. Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Left side begins to teach the right side for 1 minute.)
    Teacher: Switch!

    Students: Switch! (The right side begins to teach and the left side listens for 1 minute.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen,
      You have a good beginning here, but we need to break it down into bite size steps. A great way to do this is add in mirror/words. You could also break your instruction paragraph down into two sections with a teach/okay in the middle. You would probably want to review the order of operation within this teach/okay lesson before asking them to teach their partner. Then do your teach/ok and switch. Remember, repetition builds dendrites! Here are 20 certification points.

      Delete
  48. T: Chicka chicka class.
    S: Chicka Chicka yes.
    T: Oh, Yeah.
    S: Oh, Yeah.
    T places point on scoreboard.
    T: Today we are going to learn about nouns. Tell your partner that you can't wait to learn about nouns,
    S: ( in excited voices) I can't wait to learn about nouns.
    T: Oh class.
    S: Oh yes.
    T: Mirror speak.
    S: Mirror speak.
    T: A noun is a person (points to self), a place (sweeps arm in front of body), or a thing (stamp foot).
    Students repeat gesture and words.
    T: (Clap, clap) Teach.
    S: (Clap, clap) Okay.
    Students turn to partners and teach gestures and words for a noun. Teacher circulates and listens.
    T: Claaaass.
    S: Yeees.
    T: Oh, yeah.
    S: Oh, yeah.
    Teacher places point on scoreboard.
    T: (Displays a noun slide from Super Speed Grammar) Laser eyes on the picture. Look for all of the nouns that you can find in the picture. You are going to teach the nouns that you find to your partner. Your teaching will sound like this: "I see a ______." Fill in the blank with a noun. For example (Pretend to pull something out of the top of your head.), "I see a penguin." You will be using tag team teach and peanut butters will begin. (Clap, clap) Teach.
    S: (Clap, clap) Okay.
    While students are teaching each other, teacher circulates and listens.
    T: Classity, class, class.
    S: Yessity, yes, yes.
    T: Oh, yeah.
    S: Oh, yeah.
    Teacher adds a point to the scoreboard.
    T: Raise your hand if your partner shared a really good sentence.
    Teacher calls on a Diamond.
    Diamond: My partner, Brieseies, had a really good sentence.
    T: Briseies, Briseies, Briseies.
    All Students: Briseies, Briseies, Briseies.
    Briseies stands up and shares her sentence.
    T: Let's give Brieseies a fifteen finger woo.
    Students join teacher in giving Briseies a fifteen finger Woo.
    T: Hands eyes.
    S: Hands eyes.
    T: Our classroom is full of nouns. Anything in our room that you can see with your eyes is a noun. You are going to teach your partner some of the nouns that you see in the room. Your teaching will sound like this: "I see a ___________ in our room."
    For example (Pretend to pull something out of the top of your head.), I see a file cabinet in our room. We will be using Uh Oh Switch, and peanut butters will begin. (Clap clap) Teach.
    S: (Clap clap) Okay.
    Teacher circulates and listens for comprehension.
    T: Oh Class.
    S: Oh, yes
    T: Too slow. Moaner Groan.
    Students groan and shrug shoulders while teacher records a point.
    T: Hands eyes.
    S: Hands eyes.
    T: Let's review one more time what a noun is. Mirror Speak (Use gestures).
    S: Mirror Speak (Use gestures).
    T: A noun is a person (points to self), place (sweeps arm in front of body), or thing (Stamps foot).
    Students repeat words and gestures.
    T: (Clap, clap) Teach.
    S: (Clap clap) Okay.
    Students turn and teach their partners.
    T: Chicka chicka class.
    S: Chicka chicka yes.
    T: You did an awesome job! Now you all know that a noun is a person (points to self), place (sweeps arm in front of body), or thing (Stamps foot). Give yourselves a pat on the back and a mighty oh yeah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joyce,
      Excellent job! You covered several techniques in your lesson and I'm sure this will excite them as they learn about nouns! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  49. Although I teach a general education classroom, I often have a class made up of mostly language impaired students, students labeled as learning disabled, and below-level readers. I have found that using the Teach - Okay method throughout every lesson all day long has had a huge, positive impact on these children - especially the language impaired students. One of my favorite things to teach with this method are vocabulary words.

    Teacher: Hey sweet class!
    Students: Hey sweet yes!

    Teacher: The first thing we will learn today in science is to learn our vocabulary
    words for our new unit. What is a force?
    Students: What is a force?

    Teacher: A force is a push or a pull. (Teacher used hand gestures. Hands up with
    pointer fingers up while saying "a force is", push hands out in front of you
    while saying "a push", and pull hands back in while saying "or a pull."

    Teacher: A force is (using gesture).
    Students: A force is (using gesture).
    Teacher: a push (using gesture).
    Students: a push (using gesture).
    Teacher: or a pull (using gesture).
    Students: or a pull (using gesture).

    Teacher: A force is a push or a pull. (Teacher uses hand gestures. Hands up with
    pointer fingers up while saying "a force is", push hands out in front of you
    while saying "a push", and pull hands back in while saying "or a pull."

    Students: A force is a push or a pull. (Teacher used hand gestures. Hands up with
    pointer fingers up while saying "a force is", push hands out in front of you
    while saying "a push", and pull hands back in while saying "or a pull."

    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    (Partners turn and sit knee to knee. Partner A teaches the new vocabulary word with words and gestures while partner B watches and listens, but also uses gestures.)

    Teacher: Class switch! (Teacher puts hand in air and pulls it down like you are
    pulling a light switch down. Teacher does this while saying class switch.)

    Students: Switch okay! (Students hold up one hand and hi-five their partner while
    saying switch okay.)

    Now partner B is teaching the new vocabulary word to partner A with words and gestures as partner B is watching, listening, and using his/her gestures.)

    Teacher: Peanut Butter!
    Students: Jelly Time!

    Teacher calls students back with the attention getter and moves on with the next word or the next step in the lesson.

    Heidi Baird

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heidi,
      You used several of the most powerful techniques (Class/Yes, switch, teach/okay)! You could change the last attention getter just a smidge to include the Class/Yes, for example, Peanut Butter class, Jelly Time yes. Including the class/yes format helps keep the continuity. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  50. Script for introducing Photosynthesis
    Me: Class shaboom
    Class: Yes shaboom.
    Me: How do we get our food?
    Student: We eat food.
    Me: Yes! How do plants get food? (If no one comes up with photosynthesis, tell directly.) Because you’re now in fifth grade, you’re mature enough to learn how the mystery of photosynthesis works. It is super cool because only plants and a few algae can perform it. Photosynthesis is the process (rolling motion of hands) where plants (gently wave hands like leaves) make sugar (fingers to smacking lips). So plants are making their own food!
    Class zoom!
    Class: Yes zoom!
    Me: Silent mirrors (we all put a finger to our lips).
    Photosynthesis is the process (rolling motion of hands) where plants (gently wave hands like leaves) make sugars (fingers to smacking lips). (Students silently mirror my gestures.)
    When I say “teach” you says “okay”. Even numbers teach odd numbers. TEACH.
    Class: OKAY. (I walk around the room the give feedback or assistance.)
    Me: CCCCCCCCClllllllllaaaaaaaaaaaassssssssssss.
    Class: YYYYYEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSS.
    Me: I love the gestures I was seeing! Plants need 3 things (hold up three fingers) to perform photosynthesis (roll hands, fingers to smacking lips). Odd numbers will be teachers next.(Finger drum roll) Teach.
    Class: (Finger drum roll) Okay. (I walk around the room and monitor student engagement and understanding.)

    I will continue in this manner, introducing water (wave motion), carbon dioxide (twirl finger in air), and sunlight (wiggle fingers high above head). When students have mastered these ideas, we will put them together into this concept: Photosynthesis is the process where plants use sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide into sugars.
    Sheryl Larson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sheryl,
      You have some great gestures to help them learn the concept of photosynthesis! Teach/Okay is such a powerful learning tool! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  51. Teacher: Classy, classy, poo?

    Students: Yessy, yessy, poo!

    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about something brand new. Say “Oh boy I can’t wait!”

    Students: Oh boy I can’t wait!

    Teacher: Today we are going to answer the question, ‘What is a symbol?’ Tell your partner what we are going to learn today. Teach! (Each time the teacher says teach he or she walks around and checks for understanding).

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Class, what is our question of the day?

    Students: Our question of the day is, ‘What is a symbol?’

    Teacher: Hands and eyes!

    Students: Hands and eyes!

    Teacher: A symbol is a picture that stands for a person (point to self), place (wiggle fingers all around), or thing (pretend to hold something in the air)! Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Claaaaaasssss!

    Students: Yeeeeeessss!

    Teacher: Now we will work with our Peanut Butter and Jelly Partners. Peanut Butters ask the question of the day and Jellies answer. Then Peanut Butters give a high five switch and Jellies ask the question while Peanut Butters answer. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Class! Class!

    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: What is a symbol?

    Students: A symbol is a person, place, or thing.

    Teacher: Hands and eyes!

    Students: Hands and eyes!

    Teacher: This picture is a symbol because it stands for McDonald’s. Teach!

    Students Okay!

    Teacher: Classity Class!

    Students: Yessity Yes!

    Teacher: This picture is a symbol because it stands for Target. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Classers?

    Students: Yessers?

    Teacher: This flag is a symbol because it stands for the United States of America. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Mooooo class!

    Students: Moooo yes!

    Teacher: This picture of my dog Copper is not a symbol because it doesn’t stand for anything. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Classssssss!

    Students: Yesssssssss!

    Teacher: This pencil is not a symbol because it doesn’t stand for anything. Teach!

    Students: Okay!

    Teacher: Click, clack, class!

    Students: Click, clack, yes!

    Teacher: You did such a great job today! Give yourselves a ten finger woo!

    Students: Woo! (They wiggle their fingers).

    Amber Hartzler




    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amber,
      That's a great lesson on recognizing symbols! Having the opportunity to teach each other will certainly keep them engaged in the lesson! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  52. *Because I am having difficulty posting this reflection, I am sending the dialogue in two parts:

    T: (in a Madea voice) “Hellerrrrr, Class!”
    S: (in a Madea voice) “Hellerrrrr, Yes!”

    T: (put hands up) “Mirror Words”
    S: (put hands up) “Mirror Words”

    T: (using big gestures and Brainies, the teacher pauses after the first question to allow students to repeat what was said) “What is a noun?” (Pause for students to repeat) “Today’s question is…. What is a noun?” (Pause for students to repeat)

    “When I say teach, I want you to make a full turn to your neighbor, use big gestures, and ask them, ‘What is a noun?’”…..(Clap, Clap) “TEACH!!”

    S: Clap, Clap, “OKAY!!” (Students turn to their neighbor and repeat the questions using big gestures and Brainies.)

    T: (From the movie Frozen) “Can I just tell you something crazy, Class?”
    S: “Can I just tell you something crazy, Yes!”

    T: “Mirror Words”
    S: “Mirror Words”

    T: “What is a noun?”
    S: “What is a noun?”

    T: “A noun is a word…”
    S: “A noun is a word…”
    T: “that names a person…” (Teacher points to self.)
    S: “that names a person…” (Students point to themselves.)…
    T: “a place…” (Teacher points to where she/her is standing.)
    S: “a place…” (Students point to where they are located.)
    T: “or a thing.” (Teacher points to a chair in the classroom.)
    S: “or a thing.” (Students point to their chair.)

    T: “Oh, Class-a-doodle doo!”
    S: “Oh, Yes-a-doodle doo!”

    T: Mirror Words
    S: Mirror Words



    T: (Using a varied tone in voice, big gestures, and Brainies)“Today, we are going to focus on nouns that name people.”
    S: (Using a varied tone in voice, big gestures, and Brainies) “Today, we are going to focus on nouns that name people.”

    T: (Using big gestures and Brainies, the teacher provides a few examples in complete sentences.) “A teacher (point to self) is a noun because a teacher (point to self again) is a person.”
    S: “A teacher (students point to teacher) is a noun because a teacher (students point to teacher) is a person.”

    T: “A baby (cradle arms as if you are holding a baby) is a noun because a baby (cradle arms again) is a person.”
    S: “A baby (cradle arms as if you are holding a baby) is a noun because a baby (cradle arms again) is a person.”

    T: “A student (teacher points to a student in the class) is a noun because a student (teacher points to a student again) is a person.”
    S: “A student (point to a student in the class) is a noun because a student (points to a student again) is a person.”

    (See next post for the rest of the dialogue for this lesson!)

    Kelly Avery
    Intern 2014

    ReplyDelete
  53. T: “Meeska Mooska, Class!”
    S: “Meeska Mooska, Yes!”

    T: “When I say teach, I want you to make a full turn to your partner and give them some examples of other nouns that name people.”

    (**Use a Tickler and whirl a lariat over your head!) “TEACH!”

    S: (The students whirl the lariat over their heads!) “OKAY!”
    (Students begin to give their partners examples of other nouns that name people.)

    T: “Classity Class Class!”
    S: “Yessity Yes, Yes!”

    T: “Mirror Words!”
    S: “Mirror Words!”

    T: “What is a noun?”
    S: “What is a noun?”

    T: “A noun is a word that can name a person.”
    S: “A noun is a word that can name a person.”

    (The teacher now will change her voice/pitch and use gestures that will represent the following examples of other nouns that are people.)

    T: “pirate” (pirate voice)
    S: “pirate”

    T: “grandfather” (elderly voice)
    S: “grandfather”

    T: “witch” (witchy voice)
    S: “witch”

    T: “dancer” (act like a ballerina)
    S: “dancer”

    T: “When I say ‘Teach’, I want the Peanut Butters to stand and ask the Jellies, ‘What is a noun?’, and I want the Jellies to use big gestures, Brainies, and give the answer to the Peanut Butters. Then when I say, ‘Switch’, I want the Jellies to stand and ask the Peanut Butters, ‘What is a noun?’ and I want the Peanut Butters to give the Jellies the answer.”

    *The teacher then cups her hand behind her ear to remind students to use “College Talk” and answer in complete sentences!

    T: (With a POWERFUL voice and a Clap Tickler) “TEACH”
    S: (With a POWERFUL voice and a Clap Tickler) “OKAY”

    Peanut butters stand while Jellies stay seated.

    The teacher moves around the room listening to the students’ answers. After about 45 seconds…

    T: “Uh-ohhh, SWITCH”
    S: “Uh-ohhh, SWITCH”

    The Peanut Butters now sit, and the Jellies stand.

    *The Peanut Butter/Jelly method allows for the teacher to identify students that are actively engaged and on task, but more importantly, those that are not!!

    Kelly Avery
    2014 Intern

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kelly,
      You have shared a very thorough example of the Teach/Okay and Mirror/Words strategy! I love your class/yes responses and the detail you put into your examples. Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  54. Teacher: Class, Class (high voice, low voice)
    Students: Yes, Yes (high voice, low voice)
    Teacher: Today we are going to talk about a shape called a triangle (draw triangle in the air). Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partner what teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: A triangle (draw triangle in the air) is a 2d shape (using flat hand signal – previously taught) with 3 (three fingers held up) sides (point to side). Clap teach!
    Students: Clap Okay! (Students teach their partner what teacher has just said using gestures.)
    Teacher: Uh-Oh Switch!
    Students: Uh-Oh Switch! (Students switch, listener becomes teacher, teacher becomes listener)
    Teacher: Classity Class!
    Student: Yesity Yes!
    Teacher: Mirror words and gestures
    Class: Mirror words and gestures
    Teacher: Where the two sides (point to side) come together is called a corner (make corner signal).
    Class: Where the two sides (point to side) come together is called a corner (make corner signal).
    Teacher: Where the sides (point to side) come together is called a corner (make corner signal). Clap clap Teach!
    Class: Clap clap Okay! Students teach partner what teacher has said with gestures.
    Teacher: Uh-Oh Switch
    Class: Uh-Oh Switch (Students switch, listener becomes teacher, teacher becomes listener)
    Teacher: Classssssss (hissing voice)
    Class: Yessssss! (hissing voice)
    Teacher: A triangle (draw triangle in the air) has three corners (make corner signal). Teach!
    Class: Okay! (Students teach their partner what teacher has just said using gestures.)
    Teacher: Uh-Oh Switch
    Class: Uh-Oh Okay! (Students switch, listener becomes teacher, teacher becomes listener)
    Teacher: A triangle (draw in the air) is a 2d shape (using flat hand signal) that has 3 (hold up 3 fingers) sides and 3 (hold up 3 fingers) corners (make corner signal). Teach! (loud and quick)
    Class: Okay (loud and quick). Students teach their partner what teacher has just said using gestures.
    Teacher: Uh-Oh Switch
    Class: Uh-Oh Okay! (Students switch, listener becomes teacher, teacher becomes listener.)

    ReplyDelete
  55. Replies
    1. Kim,
      Nice work! You could even give them a points on the Scoreboard at the end (or during) the lesson to encourage their effort! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  56. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Chapters 8-10 Teach Okay
    Teacher: Class!
    Student: Yes!
    T: Today we are going to learn about metaphors! Tell your neighbor how excited you are to learn about metaphors!
    S: I am so excited to learn about metaphors!
    T: Mirror Words!
    S: Mirror Words!
    T: What is a metaphor? (use open arms question gesture)
    S: repeat the question and gesture.
    T: Mirrors off!
    S: Mirrors off!
    T: Class class!
    S: Yes yes!
    T: Tell your partner what the question is. (clap clap) Teach!
    S: (clap clap) Ok!
    T: Oh class!
    S: Oh yes!
    T: MW – A metaphor is a figure of speech that says one thing is another different thing! Teach!
    S: Okay! (repeats what the teacher said, the 1’s teaching the 2’s)
    T: (walking around to monitor teaching) Tag team switch!
    S: Tag team switch! (the 2’s teach the 1’s)
    T: Cool class!
    S: Cool yes!
    T: The simplest form of a metaphor is “the first thing IS a second thing.” (using gesture of two hands parallel on the right side of the teacher’s body and then moving them to the left side on the word IS.) Teach!
    S: The students repeat with gesture.
    T: Classsssssssss
    S: Yesssssssssssssss
    T: The simplest form of a metaphor is “the blank IS a blank” where we compare two unlike things. (repeat gesture from above) Teach!
    S: The students repeat with gesture.
    T: Let’s look at some examples: MW Her home was a prison.
    S: MW Her home was a prison.
    T: We are comparing her home to a prison. Teach!
    S: students repeat the explanation
    T: Class!
    S: Yes!
    T: Is her home really a prison?
    S: No!
    T: We are only comparing her home to a prison. Talk to your partner about how someone’s home could be like a prison. Teach!
    S: OK! The students discuss ways a home may be like a prison, it is cold, she isn’t allowed out, she is grounded, she never has any fun, her parents are strict etc.
    T: Class class class!
    S: Yes, yes yes!
    T: I heard you say that a home can be like a prison because it is cold, she might be grounded, and maybe she has no fun because her parents are too strict. Teach!
    S: Ok!
    Teacher gives other examples and discusses what is being compared and why, eventually introducing a graphic organizer. George is a sheep. The house is a dump. The car is a banana. At each step the teacher has students repeat the metaphor, what is compared, and discussion about the reasons they can be compared.

    Carl Rust

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carl,
      Great job on this lesson! I might have to use some points from it! Here are your 25 certification points. Keep it up!

      Delete
  58. Lesson Objective: The students will use prefixes to determine the meaning of a word.

    Teacher: Class, Class, Class!
    Students: Yes, yes, yes!


    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about prefixes! Tell your neighbor how excited you are to learn about prefixes! Clap, Clap, Teach (thumbs up)!

    Students: Clap, clap, Okay (thumbs up)! I’m so excited to learn about prefixes!!
    Teacher: Oh class!

    Students: Oh yes!


    Teacher: A prefix is a word part that’s added to the beginning of a word. Mirrors, Mirrors Mirrors.
    Students: Mirrors, Mirrors, Mirrors,

    Teacher: Using gestures: “A prefix(make a P in sign language), is a word part (make a W in sign language and then put hands up about 4 inches apart palms facing each other), that’s added(make an addition sign with arms), to the beginning of the word(put both hands up facing each other and shift hands to the left of your body, then shift to the middle and spread your hands out to resemble the base word.)

    Students: The students mirror the teacher.
    Teacher: Tell you partner what a prefix is using gestures. (Slap the desk, four times, on the last slap say Teach!
    Students: Slap the desk four times Okay! (Students teach their neighbor what a prefix is using gestures.)

    Teacher: uhoh switch
    Students: uhoh switch(partners take turns speaking and listening)

    Teacher: Yo Yo yo class!
    Students: Yo, Yo , Yo yes!


    Teacher: The prefixes non- and un- usually mean “not.” (teacher repeats this 3 times) Tell you partner what non- and un-means. Clap Clap Teach (thumbs up)
    Students: Clap, clap Okay(thumbs up)! Students teach their neighbor what non and un means.

    Teacher: uhoh switch
    Students: uhoh switch(partners take turns speaking and listening)

    Teacher: Ahoy class!

    Students: Ahoy yes!


    Teacher: Did you know that I could find the meaning of the word unhappy?
    Students: Really? Tell us more Mrs. Snyder!
    Teacher: Okay, I will!! Un is the prefix and happy is the base word. I know un means not, so unhappy means not happy, or not feeling glad.(teacher repeats this 3 times) Tell your partner how cool you are by telling them how you could find the meaning of the word unhappy. Clap, clap, Teach!(Thumbs up)

    Students: Clap, Clap Okay! (Thumbs up) Students teach their neighbor how to find the meaning of a word.

    Teacher: uhoh switch
    Students: uhoh switch (partners take turns speaking and listening)

    Teacher: Class! Class! Class!

    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!


    Teacher: Now, let’s review. A prefix is a word part that’s added to the beginning of a word, for example “un” means not and “non” means not. Clap, Clap, Teach!(thumbs up)
    Students: Clap, Clap Okay!(thumbs up) Students teach their neighbor what the teacher has just said.)
    Teacher: uhoh switch
    Students: uhoh switch(partners take turns speaking and listening)

    You did it Class!
    We did it Yes!

    Arlene Snyder

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Arlene,
      Great job using teach/okay, mirrors and switch! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  59. Me: Class! Class!
    Class: Yes! Yes!
    Me: Teach your partner what we learned yesterday about ungrouping from tens in subtraction. Clap, clap, clap, teach!
    Class: clap, clap, clap, Okay!
    Me: Oh class?
    Class: Oh yes?
    Me: Today, you will learn how to ungroup (gesture) from the hundreds when subtracting (gesture). Use your gestures. (Tiny clap), Teach!
    Class: Tiny clap, Okay. (They teach using gestures)
    Me: Class!
    Class: Yes!
    Me: Can we subtract 3 tens from 2 tens? No. [Using the document camera] How do we ungroup a 100’s flat [manipulative] in this problem: 228 – 135 = ? Teach your partner behind you what you think we should do. Clap,Teach!
    Class: Clap, Okay!
    Me: Switch!
    Me: When the number on the bottom in the tens column is greater, we ungroup one of the hundreds flats by replacing it with longs [manipulative]. How many longs do I need to replace one flat? Hold up that many fingers. (wait) I need 10 longs. [I physically trade them to show on the document camera].
    Instead of having (2) 100s flats, now I have 1 flat, 12 longs and 8 cubes on top. Teach your neighbor that I still have the same amount,228, on the top. Teach!
    Class: Okay! [teaching]
    Me: Can I subtract three tens now that I have 12 tens on top? Yes I can. Watch. [subtract from 3 tens from 12 tens].
    Class, turn to your side neighbor and tell her how many hundreds, tens and ones I have left. Clap, Clap, Teach!
    Class: Clap, Clap, Okay!
    Me: Cla…..ss
    Class: Ye….ss.
    Me: Class give me a YES! or a NO WAY! Do I have 228 left?
    Class: NO WAY!
    Me: Do I have 93 left?
    Class: Yes!
    Me: Mirror.
    Class: Mirror.
    Me: When you subtract (gesture), and the number of tens on the top is smaller, ungroup (gesture) from the hundreds place. Clap x4,Teach!
    Class: Clap x4, Okay!

    Signed Jim Hobley, Wholebrainer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim,
      Nice lesson! Good use of Teach-Okay to get lots of reps in! Here are 25 points for you!

      Delete
  60. Lesson: Rhythm, movement and Echo
    Grade 3 Music Class
    I use partner groups peanut butter/jellly or bees/behives or eagles/nests depending on grade level. My 3rd grade did a performance this past year called Peanut Butter Jam so they liked being Peanut Butter/Jelly.

    T: Class, Class.
    S: Yes, Yes.

    T: Today we are going to use our body rhythm cards to work on rhythm, movement and echoing. (teacher passes out cards)
    On each card you will see a motion listed. We will go through the motion names and the movements you will do for each.

    T: Mirror, Mirror.
    S: Mirror, Mirror.

    T: Snap your fingers. ~ (say the words and do the motion)
    S: Snap your fingers.

    T: Clap your hands.
    S: Clap your hands.

    T: Whap your belly.
    S: Whap your belly.

    T: Lap - Tap your lap. (Clarification: The word on the card is Lap for tap your lap because the word tap is used for tapping your feet)
    S: Lap - Tap your lap.

    T: Tap your feet.
    S: Tap your feet.

    T: Classity class class.
    S: Yesity yes yes.

    T: Mirror directions.
    S: Mirror directions.

    T: "Peanut Butter" partner you will read the words on the card.
    S: "Peanut Butter" partner you will read the words on the card.

    T: "Jelly" Partner you will echo the words
    S: "Jelly" Partner you will echo the words

    T: Don't forget to wait for me to yell "switch" for you to switch talking.

    T: "Jelly" Partner you will do the body rhythm from the card.
    S: "Jelly" Partner you will do the body rhythm from the card.

    T: "Peanut Butter" partner you will echo the body rhythm from the card.
    S: "Peanut Butter" partner you will echo the body rhythm from the card.

    T: Class, class, class.
    S: Yes, yes, yes

    T: (clap, clap) Teach (hand out in front of my like I am doing a double high 5.
    S: (clap, clap) OK (they put their hands out like they are doing a double high 5 back to me)

    (Give time for them to work with partners on the body rhythm cards.)

    T: switch
    S: switch

    (give students time to complete the rhythm on the card with their partner)

    T: hands and eyes
    S: hands and eyes

    T: Good work today. Now let's review what we did today.

    T: We were saying, moving and echoing to various body rhythms: Snap your fingers, Clap your hands, Whap your belly, Tap your lap, and Tap your feet. (teacher does motions as she says the motion) Teach!

    S: OK! (Students teach their partner what the teacher just said)


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mitzi,
      Great job on your lesson! Make sure to give the students plenty of time to do the motions and echos so they have to do it over and over for the repetition. The more they repeat, the more they remember. Grow those dendrites!
      Here are your 25 certification points and 5 BONUS points!

      Delete
  61. Chapters 8-10: Teach, Okay

    Write a short dialogue, like one of the samples in Chapters 8-10, demonstrating the use of Teach-Okay in one of your favorite lessons.

    Scene: 3rd grade class

    Teacher: Classity class!
    Students: Yessity yes!
    Teacher: (Teacher gestures while speaking) We are going to learn about multiplication. It will be fun and exciting. Tell your partner how excited you are to be learning about multiplication. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partners and use hand gestures.)
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Multiplication is another word for repeated addition. That means 2x3 is the same as two threes added together. Teach! (Hold up three fingers on each hand and move them together.)
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partners and use hand gestures.)
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Switch! (Partners give each other a high five while saying switch. Then the second student teaches the information to his/her partner.)
    Teacher: Oh Class! (Clap clap)
    Students: Oh Yes! (Clap clap)
    Teacher: (Hold up 2 fingers three times.) If we have 3x2, that would mean that you could add 2+2+2. Easy peasy! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partners and use hand gestures.)
    Teacher: (Gesture to show mind picture and pretend drawing a picture.) You can also create a picture in your mind or draw pictures of the number group repeated. We can use multiplication to find the total when we have repeated groups of the same size. Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partners and use hand gestures.)
    Teacher: If we have 2 extra minutes for recess for 4 days in a row, you could say that you had 2x4=8 extra minutes of recess for the week. (Hold up two sets of 4 on your hands.) Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach their partners and use hand gestures.)
    Teacher: Let's review. Multiplication is easy because we all know that adding is easy. Multiplication is a quick way of finding the total when we have many groups of the same number. Tell your partner how fun it feels to learn about multiplication! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students tell their partner "how fun it feels to learn about multiplication.")

    Hannah Palmer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hannah,
      Great job! Multiplication really can be FUN when using these techniques! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  62. Teacher: Class, class, class, class. class (say rapidly)
    Students: Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes (rapidly)
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn what the number 5(hold up the number 5 and wiggle all 5 fingers) looks like.Teach
    Students: Okay (students repeat what I said while enthusiastically wiggling fingers)
    Teacher: 5 has a short neck (put hands slightly apart to show short and point to neck), a belly fat (hold hands out from belly and make a Santa gesture), 5 wears a hat (tap head with hand). Teach
    Students: Okay (students repeat what I said making gestures and giggling)
    Teacher: Class (using 5 finger wave)
    Class: Yes (using 5 finger wave)
    Teacher: 1,2,3,4,5, Switch
    Students: 1,2,3,4,5 Switch (students switch and teach partner)
    Teacher: Stomp 5 times class
    Student: Stomp 5 times yes
    Teacher: This is how we draw a 5 (Drawing a 5 in the air, repeat Short neck, belly fat, 5 wears a hat.) Teach.
    Student: Okay (students repeat while drawing a 5 in the air)
    Teacher: Clap 5 times switch.
    Student: Clap 5 times switch (students switch and teach partner)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Melissa,
      Ha! This was so cute! What a fun way to introduce numbers! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  63. This is from a reading lesson I taught to my third graders just this past week:

    Teacher: Classity class?!

    Class: Yessity yes!

    Teacher: Yesterday in Reading Workshop, we discussed metacognition- thinking about our thinking- and just how important it is for us to have thoughts about what we are reading. When I say teach, teach your partner all about metacognition from yesterday’s lesson. Teach!

    Class: Okay! [explains & gestures metagognition]

    Teacher: Class-to-the-class-to-the-class-de-class-de-class!

    Class: Yes-to-the-yes-to-the-yes-de-yes-de-yes!

    Teacher: Today in Reading Workshop, I’ll teach you one way good readers can use metacognition while reading! Today we’ll be answering the question, “How can we make a connection to our text?” How can we make a connection in our text? Tell your neighbor today’s Reading Workshop question!

    Class: [Repeating over & over] “How can we make a connection to our text?”

    Teacher: Classy classy?!

    Class: Yesy yesy!

    Teacher: Today we’ll learn the first of 3 different kinds of connections we can make to our text! The first connection is a text-to-self connection (gesture: hands mime opening a book; then crossing arms over chest, hugging their shoulders]. When I say teach, teach your neighbor our first type of connection. *clap clap* Teach!

    Class: *Clap clap* Okay! [says & gestures text-to-self connections]

    Teacher: Okie dokie, class!

    Class: Okie dokie, yes!

    Teacher: A text-to-self connection happens when what you are reading makes you think about something in your life! Again, a text-to-self connection happens when what you are reading makes you think about something in your life! When I say teach, explain to your partner what a text-to-self connection is …la la la TEACH!

    Class: La la la OKAY! [explains & gestures]

    Teacher: Claasssss!

    Class: Yessssss!

    Teacher: In a text-to-self connection, readers will think about what they are reading and make a connection to their lives. This makes us feel more invested in what we are reading and helps us to enjoy our books more! For example, in the book Matilda, Matilda’s teacher, Miss Honey, reminds me of my first grade teacher because both of these people were very loving and caring towards their students and wore glasses. It makes me feel all warm and fuzzy to remember one of my most favorite teachers, and so now when I think about Miss Honey, I’ve made this connection between her and my first grade teacher and feel warm and fuzzy all over again! Explain to your neighbor what a text-to-self connection is again…TEACH! TEACH!

    Class: OKAY! OKAY! [students teach their partners]

    Teacher: Now I’ll read you the poem “Feeling the Rain” by Julie Spreckles. While I’m reading, gesture along with me and try to make a text-to-self connection with this beautiful poem! [Reads students the poem]

    Think about this wonderful poem concerning the rain. What text-to-self connections did you make with this poem to something in your life? When I say teach, partner #1 please tell partner #2 any text-to-self connections you’ve made…*clap clap* Teach!

    Class: *Clap clap* Okay! [Partner #1 explains with gestures their text-to-self connections, while partner #2 mimics their gestures]

    Teacher: [after some time passes] SWITCH!

    Class: Okay! SWITCH! [Partners high-five each other, and now partner #2 tells partner #1 their connections while partner#1 mimics their gestures]

    Teacher: Oppa Gangnam Style, class!

    Class: Oppa Gangnam Style, yes!

    Teacher: Lovely connections, boys and girls! [Comments on connections heard during Teach-Okay]. Once more, what is a text-to-self connection? Teach!!

    Class: Okay!! [kids teach each other]

    Teacher: Okily dokily, class!

    Class: Okily dokily, yes!

    Teacher: Awesome! Ten finger wooooo to all of you!!

    Everyone: WOOOOOO!! [wiggling their fingers]

    Teacher: Now, from this day forth, please try to make some text-to-self connections while you are reading independently and do remember to jot these down in your reader’s notebooks! And away you go! [Kids go off to independently read]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Briannne,
      Great job! You did a nice job explaining and using examples as you taught the gestures! The kids should be able to remember this and you will probably see many of them making these gestures as they read! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus for details!

      Delete
  64. Kindergarten EFL Classroom (Age 5) - The Days of the Week integrated with ordinal numbers.

    Teacher: Claaass!
    Students: Yeeess!

    Teacher: Hands, hands, hands and eyes!
    Students: Hands, hands, hands and eyes!

    Teacher: You remember we talked about the days of the week yesterday. Let’s remember the days of the week!
    Students: (After the teacher) Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday!

    Teacher: Tuesday, Class!
    Students: Tuesday, Yes!

    Teacher: Now, ask your partner “How many days are there in a week?”
    Students: How many days are there in a week?

    Teacher: Clasity Class!
    Students: Yessity Yes!

    Teacher: Mirror Words!
    Students: Mirror Words!

    Teacher: There are seven days in a week. (With big gestures)
    Students: There are seven days in a week.

    Teacher: Five week days,
    Students: Five week days,

    Teacher: Two weekend days.
    Students: Two weekend days.

    Teacher: Chukka chukka class!
    Students: Chukka chukka Yes!

    Teacher: Turn to your partner, use big gestures. (Clap, clap, click, click) Teach!
    Students: (Clap, clap, click, click) Okay!

    Students: There are seven days in a week. Five week days and two weekend days.

    Teacher: Claaaaas!
    Students: Yeeess!

    Teacher: Ask your partner “What’s the first day of the week?”
    Students: What’s the first day of the week?

    Teacher: Tik tok, Clas!
    Students: : Tik tok,Yes!

    Teacher: Mirror Words!
    Students: Mirror Words!

    Teacher: The first day of the week is Monday. (Doing the gestures and the action assigned for Monday)
    Students: “The first day of the week is Monday”.

    Teacher: First, “Bees” teach “Caterpillars”. When I say “Switch”, Caterpillars take turns to teach. (Clap, clap, clap, tap on the lap) Teach!
    Students: (Clap, clap, clap, tap on the lap) Okay! (“The first day of the week is Monday”.)

    Teacher: Claaass!
    Students: Yeees!

    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Switch!

    Teacher Hickory, Class!
    Students: Dickory, Yes!

    Teacher: Mirror Words!
    Students: Mirror Words!

    Teacher: The second day of the week is Tuesday.
    Students: The second day of the week is Tuesday

    Teacher: (Clap, clap, click click, 2 taps on the lap) Teach!
    Students: (Clap, clap, click click, 2 taps on the lap) Okay!
    (We repeat with all days of the week. As the kids are beginner I give them each sentence separately, one by one.)

    Teacher: Boom, boom, Class!
    Students: : Boom, boom, Yes!

    Teacher: Fingers up!
    Students: Fingers up!

    Teacher: Give yourself ten finger woo!
    Students: Wooooo!

    Teacher: You did a great job. Give me a mighty “Oh, Yeah!”.
    Students: Oh, Yeah!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pinar,
      Nice job teaching the days of the week! This will make it fun and really help with their retention! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  65. Script/Lesson: Greeting and Goodbyes Unit 1

    Teacher: Clase
    Students: dime
    teacher: Repite
    Students: OK
    Teacher: Buenos días (gestures with a big stretch and a yawn)
    Students: Mirror and repeat teacher
    Teacher: Buenos días (gestures) repeated 3-5 times
    Students: Repeat 3-5 times
    Teacher: ¡Enseña!(teach)
    Students: ¡Enseguida!(right now) Students then turn and teach.
    (if students are not participating I use “ESPEJOS” mirrors and have the students mirror me, with my eye on the non-participant)
    Teacher: Clase
    Students: dime
    Teacher: Repite
    Students: OK
    Teacher: Buenas tardes (gestures at watch on wrist)
    Students: Repeat 3-5 times
    Teacher: Buenos días (gestures)
    Students: repeat
    Teacher: Buenas tardes (gestures)
    Students: repeat
    Teacher: ¡Enseña!
    Students: ¡Enseguida! Students then turn and teach BOTH words with gestures.
    (this continues thru a list of about 5-7 words and may contain words from the day before)
    Teacher: ¡CAMBIA! (change)
    Students: ¡Estoy cambiando! (I’m changing, as they are moving...moved before done saying Estoy cambiando.)
    Teacher: Clase
    Students: dime
    (Adding words until all 5-7 are reviewed)

    This is basically how it goes, with more animation and silliness that is hard to show on paper! My philosophy of teaching always has been that students should be having so much fun they don’t even realize they are learning. This method marries perfectly with everything I believe in!

    Becky Loftus
    Spanish
    Oberon Middle School

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Becky,
      I imagine your students will remember Spanish class, and what they learned, long after the course ends! Nice job! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  66. Teacher: Froggy class!
    Students: Yes, ribbit ribbit!

    Teacher: Today we will learn about the water cycle. The water cycle is the constant change of water in Earth’s atmosphere. The atmosphere is the layers of gases that wrap around the entire planet. What is the water cycle? What is an atmosphere? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students turn and teach their neighbor the water cycle and atmosphere).

    Teacher: Monster class!
    Students: Yes, roar!

    Teacher: The first step of the water cycle is evaporation. Evaporation happens when heat from the sun warms water on the ground. The heated water turns from a liquid to a gas and floats as water vapor up into the atmosphere. (Shows hands rising from the floor with fingers wiggling). What is evaporation? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students teach evaporation with motion).

    Teacher: Despereaux class!
    Students: Yes, once upon a time!

    Teacher: The second step of the water cycle is condensation. Condensation happens high up in Earth’s atmosphere. The water vapor that just evaporated cools off in the air and comes close together. When it cools and gets close it changes from a gas back to a liquid and creates clouds. (Show hands far apart then come together and clasp in front of you). What is condensation? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students teach condensation with motion).

    Teacher: Wilbur class!
    Students: Yes, some pig!

    Teacher: The third step of the water cycle is precipitation. When the water droplets in the cloud become too heavy, they fall to the Earth below. Precipitation can stay liquid or cool more to become a solid. Liquid precipitation is rain or sleet while solid precipitation is snow or hail. (Show hands falling to the ground with fingers wiggling). What is precipitation? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students teach precipitation with motion).

    Teacher: Place Value class!
    Students: Yes, ones, tens, hundreds, thousands!

    Teacher: The final step of the water cycle is collection. Water that has fallen to the ground will flow downhill and pool together in puddles, streams, rivers, lakes, oceans, and groundwater. (Make a swishing movement with both hands).Groundwater is the water that seeped underneath the Earth’s soil and comes together underground. What is collection? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students teach collection with motion).

    Teacher: Miggery Sow class!
    Students: Yes, gor!

    Teacher: Let’s review the four steps of the water cycle. Step 1: evaporation where water is heated by the sun and changes to a gas rising into the air as water vapor. Step 2: condensation where water cools in the air and forms clouds as liquid droplets. Step 3: precipitation where the droplets are too big and fall to Earth from the clouds as rain, snow, hail, or sleet. Step 4: collection the water on the ground flows and pools together. What are the steps of the water cycle in order? Teach!

    Students: Okay! (Students teach the water cycle steps with motion).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Veronica,
      You did a nice job tying the gestures to the concepts! I would suggest that you break your teach/okay steps down even more to keep the initial information in smaller chunks. For example, in your first teach okay, do water cycle (teach/okay), and then atmosphere (teach/okay). You could add in some mirror/words too to give the kids even more exposure to the new information. Great work! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  67. Math lesson over capacity

    Teacher: “Classity, class, class, class”
    Students: “Yesity, yes, yes, yes”
    Teacher: “Mirror hands”
    Students: "Mirror hands"
    Teacher: “Today we are going to focus our learning on capacity.” (Gestures: I point to the ground for “today” and make a magnifying glass with both of my hands over one eye for “focus” (this came from one of my students) then put hands in the air as if asking a question.)
    Students: Students are mirroring the gestures I am currently using.
    Teacher: Now, turn to your neighbor and use big gestures silently showing your neighbor what I just showed you. “Teach!”
    Student: “Okay!”
    Students turn to their neighbor using only mirror hands, following each other to show listening and watching of today's objective.
    Teacher: “Classadoodle doo!”
    Students: “Yesadoodle doo!”
    Teacher: “Who can teach the class, only using gestures, what we are going to be learning in math today?”
    Student raises hand and is called on to teach the class. Student gets the class’ attention like the teacher, uses mirror hands, and the rest of the class follows the mirrors.
    Teacher: “Class, class, class, class, class, class” (voice volume moving from high to low).
    Students: “Class, class, class, class, class, class” (voice volume moving from high to low).
    Teacher: Okay, here’s our big question! “Mirror and talking hands.”
    Students: “Mirror and talking hands.”
    Teacher: “What is capacity?” (my capacity power pix is showing on the board)
    Students: “What is capacity?"
    Teacher: Turn and ask your neighbor the question I just asked you, and remember, use your biggest gestures and your most excited voice! “Teach (with 5 claps)”
    Students: “Okay (with 5 claps)” Students turn to their neighbor and ask the big question using big gestures and excited voices.
    Teacher: “Class oh class oh class!”
    Students: “Yes oh yes oh yes!”
    Teacher: You’re doing such a fantastic job teaching each other! Give me an “Oh Yea!”
    Students: “Oh Yea!”
    Teacher: “Mirror and talking hands” (said in a calm voice)
    Students: Mirror and talking hands” (said in a calm voice)
    Teacher: “Capacity”
    Students: “Capacity”
    Teacher: “...is the amount of liquid…” I wave my hands in the air in front of my body like water waves.
    Students: “...is the amount of liquid…” Students wave their hands in the air in front of their body like water waves.
    Teacher: “...a container can hold” I make a large circle with my arms and hands like a basketball goal to represent a container.
    Students: “...a container can hold” Students make a large circle with their arms and hands like basketball goal to represent container.
    *We practice this several times before turning and talking, gradually make the chunks of information larger and larger until students are repeating the entire definition of capacity.
    Teacher: “Now turn to your neighbor and teach your neighbor capacity.” “Teach” (clap quickly 3 times).
    Students: “Okay” (clap quickly 3 times).

    *Once the entire class has practiced it, I call on 1 or 2 students to teach the entire class what their partner just taught them. Students follow along as their classmate teaches.

    Teacher: “Class you rock!”
    Students: “Yes we rock!”
    Teacher: “What are some examples of containers that have capacity?” “Turn and pick your neighbor’s brain!” “Teach (clap slowly 2 times)”
    Students: “Okay (clap slowly 2 times)” Students “pick their neighbor’s brain” about different containers that have capacity.
    Teacher: “Classey class!”
    Students: “Yessey yes!”
    Teacher: “What are the containers you and your partner discussed?” Many students raise their hand and several share their answers. “I love all the awesome examples I am hearing from your discussions with your partners!” “Give me an Oh Yea!”
    Students: Excitedly “Oh Yea!”

    Ellen Tucker

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellen,
      Great job using Mirrors and Teach/Okay! The repetition will be very helpful as they learn this new concept, and the element of fun will really engage their limbic systems! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  68. Described below is a Teach-okay pattern that I used during kindergarten writing workshop. The students were introduced to the writing “tools” early in the year but as their writing became more advanced they lost confidence in their abilities to write tricky words. They repeatedly asked “how to you spell …?” The following lesson was taught to reassure them that they could be successful and independent writers. Monika Fridrich

    Teacher: Classity class class
    Students: Yessity yes yes
    Teacher: Today, we will be talking about what writers like you do when they get to a word they don’t know how to spell. When I say Teach, you say Okay and teach your partner what we will be talking about today. (Clap, clap) Teach.
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay. (Students turn to their writing partner and repeat what the teacher said).
    Teacher: (using papa bear voice) Claaaaass
    Students: (imitate papa bear voice) Yeeess
    Teacher: What do writers do when they get to tricky words that are hard to spell? Do they ask the teacher “how to you spell…?” No Way! (Teacher shakes her head vigorously). The writers use writing tools! Give me AHA!
    Students: AHA
    Teacher: Teach your partner what writers do when they get stuck? (Teacher claps, slaps thighs, and points). Teach.
    Students: (Clap, slap thighs, and point) Okay. (Students do a full body turn to their partner and repeat what the teacher said).
    Teacher: (uses baby bear voice) Class, class.
    Students: (imitate baby bear voice) Yes, yes.
    Teacher: There are three tools we use to write a tricky word. One, (show a pinky) writers check (write a check with the pinky in the air) the word wall (point to the word wall). (Clap, clap) Teach.
    Students: (Clap, clap) Okay. (Students turn to their partner repeating what the teacher said using the same gestures).
    Teacher: (uses mama bear voice) Class, class.
    Students: (imitate mama bear voice) Yes, yes.
    Teacher: Two, (add a ring finger) writers look (put “binoculars” on and pretend to search) around the room for labels and signs. (Clap, clap) Teach.
    Students: (Clap, clap) Okay. (Students turn to their partner repeating what the teacher said using the same gestures).
    Teacher: (quickly) Class, class, class.
    Students: (quickly) Yes, yes, yes.
    Teacher: Three, (add a middle finger) writers say the word slowly and listen for the sounds (use both hands to model stretching a rubber band while pretending to listen). (Clap, clap) Teach.
    Students: (Clap, clap) Okay. (Students turn to their partner repeating what the teacher said using the same gestures).
    Teacher: (singing) Classity, class, class.
    Students: (singing) Yessity, yes, yes.
    Teacher: When I say Teach, you say Okay and teach your partner all three tools you can use when you get to a tricky word. Remember to use big gestures. Keep talking until I call you back. (Clap, clap) Teach.
    Students: (Clap, clap) Okay. (Students teach each other the three tools they can use when they don’t know how to spell a word).

    Teacher walks around the classroom and listens for comprehension. She reteaches the lesson as needed and then sends students to their seats for the independent writing time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Monika,
      This will be a very helpful tool for your young writers! One suggestion would be to insert another teach/okay before asking them to teach their partner all 3 tools in which you model all three together, helping them visualize what you are requesting. Great job! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  69. First Grade Science Class
    Parts of a Plant and their Functions
    Students are divided into ones and twos prior to lesson.

    T: Classy, classy!
    S: Yessy, yessy!
    T: Yesterday we learned about the basic needs of plants. The basic needs of plants are:
    air (move hands in air above head)
    water (wiggle fingers from above head toward ground)
    sun (make a big circle w/ hands above head)
    soil (make a digging motion) TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Ones repeat information using motions to their partners)
    T: Switch!
    S: Switch! (Twos repeat information w/ motions.)
    T: Classssss!
    S: Yessssss!
    T: Today we are going to learn about the parts of plants and how they help the plant. TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Students repeat)
    T: Class! Class!
    S: Yes! Yes!
    T: The first part of a plant we will learn about is the roots. The roots grow under the ground. (Lay one hand horizontally in front of chest. Swing other hand under the horizontal)
    Ones TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Ones repeat information w/ motion)
    T: Class (in whisper)
    S: Yes (in whisper)
    T: The roots are like the plants feet (point to feet). They hold the plant in the ground. They get nutrients and water from the soil. Twos TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Twos repeat information.)
    T: Cla-a-a-a-ss
    S: Ye-e-e-e-ss
    T: Another part of a plant is the stem (Pinch thumbs and forefingers together. Move apart vertically as though pulling thread through a needle.) The stem holds the flower off the ground. (Put hands on either side of head as though holding it up.) Ones TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Ones teach w/ motions.)
    T: Class 1-2!
    S: Yes 3-4!
    T: The stem is like a straw (make sucking noise with lips). It sucks the water and nutrients from the roots (point to feet) and sends them to other parts of the plant. Twos TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Twos repeat information)
    T: Class
    S: Yes
    T: Leaves are also a plant part. The leaves grow off the stem. Twos TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Twos teach)
    T: Clossy, Clossy
    S: Yossy, Yossy
    T: The leaves are the kitchen of the plant. They take the nutrients and water from the stem and mix them with sunlight to make food for the plant. (Hold a bowl with one arm & make stirring motion with other.) Ones TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Ones teach w/ motions)
    T: Cl-cl-cl-class
    S: Y-y-y-yes
    T: The final part of the plant we will talk about today is the flower. The flower is the pretty part that grows from the stem. Ones TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Ones teach)
    T: Classity-class
    S: Yessity-yes
    T: The flower is where the nectar, pollen, and seeds are found. Twos TEACH!
    S: Okay! (Twos teach)
    T: Class
    S: Yes
    T: We have just learned what the parts of a plant are. Let’s return to our seats to draw and label a picture of our own plant.

    Elisabeth Thompson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elisabeth,
      Nice use of Teach Okay to support your lesson. I recommend you add another Teach Okay to summarize all the parts of the plant before releasing the class to the next activity. Here are 25 points!

      Delete
  70. We recently finished our “Ecosystems” unit where we learned about “producers”. Our lesson went something like this (it is hard to describe the multitude of gestures we were also doing…but please be aware that they were used!):

    T: Classity class class
    S: Yessity yes yes
    T: Mirror! The big question is, what are producers? Teach!
    S: Okay! The big question is, what are producers?
    T: Oh oh oh class
    S: oh oh oh yes
    T: Mirror! Producers make their own food from energy directly from the sun. Teach!
    S: Ok! Producers make their own food from energy directly from the sun.
    T: My SWEEEEET class!
    S: My SWEEEET yes!
    T: Producers do not have to eat because they take the sun’s energy and use it to produce their own food. Plants are producers. Teach!
    S: Ok! (Students repeat my extra information to their partners)
    T: Oh my my my class!
    S: Oh my my my yes!
    T: Get ready for the next part. It’s going to be fun! Are you ready?
    S: I’m sooooooo ready!
    T: Using the “high five switch”, I want you to alternate with your partner and name different producers! Teach!
    S: Ok! (students use high five switch and go back and forth naming different producers while I walk around monitoring and listening)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shila,
      Great job using teach/okay! Adding the "high five switch" at the end is the perfect way to have them include critical thinking skills as they come up with different producers. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  71. Miss Meacham: Class! Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes! Yes!
    Miss Meacham: Today we are going to talk about two parts of speech! Without knowing the parts of speech, our sentences don’t make sense! Now, tell your partners how you don’t like sentences that don’t make sense and put your hands in the air like you just don’t understand ridiculous sentences! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students tell each other how much they dislike sentences that don’t make sense and throw their hands up in the air dramatically.)
    Miss Meacham: Classity Classity Classity!
    Students: Yessity Yessity Yessity!
    Miss Meacham: Parts of speech are important to know so that we can put smart sentences together. There are many parts of speech that we need to know, but we are going to talk about two today! How many parts of speech are we going to talk about today?
    Students: Two!
    Miss Meacham: Super! You guys are geniuses! Let’s start with the basics! A noun is a person, place, thing, or animal. Basically, it is a something! I want you to teach your partners what a noun is! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students tell each other that a noun is a person, place, thing, or animal. They may also say that it is a something.)
    Miss Meacham: Ohhhhhhh Classsssss!
    Students: Ohhhhhhh Yesssssss!
    Miss Meacham: To help us remember what a noun is, we will do these three gestures. When you say person, point to yourself (I point to myself), when you say place, raise your hands above your hand to make the roof of a house (I make a house out of my hands above my head), and when you say thing, point to your desk (I point to a desk). Okay class, teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students teach each other the gestures using words and mode the gestures to one another.)
    Miss Meacham: Hey class!
    Students: Hey yes!
    Miss Meacham: Up next we have verbs. A verb is an action; it is something you do. Singing, dancing, jumping, eating, and walking are all verbs! I want you to teach your partners what a verb is! Teach!
    Students: Okay! (Students tell each other that a verb is an action.)
    Miss Meacham: Class Class!
    Students: Yes Yes!
    Miss Meacham: Remembering verbs is easy! Whatever you do, whether it’s physical or mental, is a verb (I jump up and down.) What am I doing class?
    Students: Jumping!
    Miss Meacham: (I dance around the room.) What am I doing class?
    Students: Dancing!
    Miss Meacham: Classssssss!
    Students: Yessssssss!
    Miss Meacham: Mirrors on!
    Students: Mirrors on!
    Miss Meacham: I do verbs every single day.
    Students: I do verbs every single day.
    Miss Meacham: A verb is an action…
    Students: A verb is an action…
    Miss Meacham: …while a noun is a something.
    Students: …while a noun is a something.
    Miss Meacham: Mirrors off!
    Students: Mirrors off!
    Miss Meacham: I hope you all had a great time learning about the parts of speech and teaching each other the parts of speech! You are all such wonderful teachers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hannah,
      What a fun way to review nouns and verbs! I'm sure they will enjoy acting out several verbs! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  72. Teacher: Class Class!
    Students: Yes yes!
    Teacher: Today in math we are going to learn about the word congruent. When I say teach, turn to your partner, and tell them how excited you are to learn about the word congruent. (Clap, clap) teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students will turn towards their partner telling them how excited they are to learn about the word congruent.)
    Teacher: Class Class 1+1
    Students: yes yes = (gesturing an equal sign) 2
    Teacher: Hand and eyes (clasping hands together)
    Students: Hands and eyes (clasping hands together ready to learn)
    Teacher: congruent means two shapes are same shape and same size (I'll make a circle with my thumb and index finger on both hands. Then I'll overlap the circles, and then I'll pull them a part.). Using big gestures (Clap clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students will turn towards their partner. Using big gestures they will teach their partner what the word congruent means.)
    Teacher: Ohhhh class!
    Students: ohhhh yes!
    Teacher: Great job! Now I'm going to show you some examples on the board. Using “yes-no way” cards you will give your answer to whether or not the shapes are congruent (making a circle with my thumb and index finger on both hands. Then I'll overlap the circles, and then I'll pull them a part.)(I'll show several examples on the board. Between each example, I'll check to see that 90% of my students are understanding the meaning of the new word. If they are not, I'll stop and go back to reteach the meaning.)
    Teacher: (After going through the examples.) classity class class!
    Students: yessity yes yes!
    Teacher: I'm so proud of how well did learning about the word congruent (making a circle with my thumb and index finger on both hands. Then I'll overlap the circles, and then I'll pull them a part.). When I say teach, turn to your partner, and tell them how excited Mrs. Sowers is that you learned about the word congruent (making a circle with my thumb and index finger on both hands. Then I'll overlap the circles, and then I'll pull them a part.).(Clap clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students will turn towards their partner telling them how excited Mrs. Sowers is that they learned about the word congruent.)
    Teacher: Class Class!
    Students: Yes yes!
    Teacher: let's begin our assignment for the day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Megan,
      Great lesson on the definition of the term congruent! Combining Class/Yes, Hands and Eyes, Teach/Okay and yes/no way cards will keep your students interested and involved. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  73. First Grade Adjective Lesson
    Previous Lessons on Nouns Delivered and Assessed
    Teacher: Class Class Class!
    Students: Yes Yes Yes!
    Teacher: Today we will learn about adjectives. Mirrors Please!
    Students: Mirrors Please!
    Teacher: I have a question. What IS an adjective? What is an ADJECTIVE? Clap Clap Teach!
    Students: Clap Clap Okay! Students repeat the questions with assigned partners and mimic teacher gestures.
    Teacher: Oh My Class!
    Students: Oh My Yes!
    Teacher: I have the answer. Mirrors Please.
    Students: Mirrors Please.
    Teacher: An adjective describes a nouns. The adjective describes a the noun. Clap Clap Teach!
    Students: Clap Clap Okay! Students repeat the answer with assigned partners mimicking teacher gestures.
    Teacher: Yo Yo Class!
    Students: Yo Yo Yes!
    Teacher: Mirrors Please
    Students: Mirrors Please
    Teacher: An adjective describes a noun. Her shirt is blue. Blue is the adjective. HER SHIRT IS BLUE! BLUE is the adjective. Clap Clap Teach!
    Students: Clap Clap Okay! Students repeat sentences to partners mimicking teacher gestures.
    Teacher: Class Awesome!
    Students: Yes Awesome!
    Teacher: Adjectives describes a noun. Her shirt is blue. Blue is the adjective. My shirt is striped. Striped is the adjective. Striped describes my shirt. When I say Teach Okay, turn to your neighbor and describe your shirt. Peanut Butters speak first. My shirt is ____. Mirrors Please.
    Students: Mirrors Please.
    Teacher: My shirt is _____.
    Students: My shirt is _____.
    Teacher: Peanut Butters first! Clap Clap Teach!
    Students: Clap Clap Okay! Peanut Butter Partners begin with: My shirt is ____.
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Jelly Partners share: My shirt is ____.
    Teacher: Boom Chicka Class!
    Students: Boom Chicka Yes!
    Teacher: Please raise your hand if you would like to share your adjective that describes your shirt. (Teacher calls on students to stand and share their sentence: My shirt is ____.)

    Megan Vescio Copeland
    Goldfarb Elementary School
    Las Vegas, NV

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Megan,
      Nice job teaching adjectives to your little ones! They will enjoy being able to share their ideas! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  74. The following illustration will give an idea of what goes on the white board during the lesson. It will be modified as needed.

    Pos +
    0------------------------------------------------------0 Ground level
    Neg --
    (clap, clap) Class, Class! (clap, clap) Yes, Yes!

    Today I want to talk to you about positive and negative numbers. This line represents ground level or zero. Everything above ground level is plus or positive, and everything below ground level is minus or negative.

    (rising pitch) Teeeeach! Okaaay!

    Switch!

    Hey, Class! Hey, Yes!

    This is a fence post that's 8 feet tall. We can represent its height as a positive numeral like this:

    8 or this: +8

    You can write a positive numeral with or without the plus sign.

    Teacharoo! Okay-aroo!

    Switch!

    (Dragnet theme) Class-class-CLASS-class! Yes-yes-YESS-yes

    This is a post hole that's 3 feet deep. We can represent its depth with a negative numeral like this:

    -3

    When you write a negative numeral, it always needs a minus sign.

    Teach, y'all! Okay, y'all!

    Switch!

    Magnificent Class! Magnificent Yes!

    Now, if we take this minus 3 foot hole and add this 8-foot fence post to it by dropping it into the hole, who can tell me how much of the fence post will stick up out of the ground? Hortense? That's right! the fence post will stick 5 feet out of the ground.

    Here's how we would write that problem:

    -3 ft. + 8 ft. = 5 ft.

    When I say teach, you will take turns teaching your partner about how much fence post sticks out of the ground when you add it to the hole, and then you will teach her/him how to write the problem.

    Go, Class! Go, Yes!

    Switch!

    Switch!

    Switch!

    Clayuss! Yayuss!

    When you turn over your handout sheet, you will find five problems. I will give you one minute to solve them. The first one to finish with all correct answers will get to lead practice in class rules. If you finish before the minute is up, stand up and put the tip of one finger on the tip of your nose. Remember, it does not count if you get even one wrong answer, so work quickly and carefully. You may visualize each problem in your mind by making each positive number a fence post and each negative number a post hole.

    (pointing to nose) On the nose, Class! On the nose, Yes!

    Begin, now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Craig,
      This is a great way to help the class see a "real" reason to learn math, and adds the fun element of WBT along the way! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Michelle.
      Although I've used the post & posthole analogy with at least one class and with individuals, I really had to think about how to present this with WBT. I believe it will connect even better this way.

      Delete
  75. Lesson: Kindergarten- Your Opinion (Journals for writing are on their desks with their crayons. The ones start teaching the twos and then vice versa.)

    Teacher: Classity Class!
    Students: Yessity Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to write our own opinion. An opinion is how you feel about something. It’s easy! Look at your partner and tell them how easy it is to learn what an opinion is! Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Switch.

    Teacher: Oh class, claaasss!
    Students: Oh, yes, yeeesss!
    Teacher: When you give your opinion, it is always right because (using gesture) it is the way you feel. Teach this to your partner. Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Switch.

    Teacher: Twinkle, Twinkle class, class, class! (Sung to the tune Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star)
    Students: Twinkle, twinkle, yes, yes, yes!
    Teacher: Today, we will write our opinion. We will write how we feel about our book, Never Kiss an Alligator. You might say, “I like the book.” You might say. “I do not like the book.” It is your choice. Teach this to your partner! Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Switch.

    Teacher: Class, class, class
    Student: Yes, yes, yes!
    Teacher: You might like the book. You might NOT like it. It is up to you. Let your partner know this again. Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Switch.

    Teacher: Class, class!
    Students: Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: Take out your journals and colors to write your opinion. When you finish, illustrate your favorite part of the book. Teach your partner what you will do. Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Switch!

    Teacher: Holy moley guacamole!! Let’s give a ten finger wooooooo for your amazing speed.
    Students give a ten finger wooooooooooooo!
    Regina-Champagne Babin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Regina,
      Ahhh, your kinders will LOVE this! What a fun and kind way for them to learn to share their opinions! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  76. Teacher: Class, class!
    Students: Yes, yes!
    Teacher: When I say Teach! You say Okay!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher: If I say Teach! Teach! Teach!, you say Okay! Okay! Okay! Teachy, Teach!
    Students: Okayee! Okay!
    Teacher: When I say Teach!, you say Okay! And turn your body toward your neighbor and teach.
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn how to greet someone in Spanish! Tell your neighbor how excited you are to begin speaking in Spanish! Teach, Teach!
    Students: Okay, Okay! Students turn toward each other and repeat
    Teacher: Hola! Me llamo__________, (hand out shaking) Hello my name is __________. Teach, teach!
    Students: Okay, okay.
    Students fumble with the pronunciation and copy gestures.
    Teacher: Clase, clase!
    Students: Si, si!
    Teacher: Otra vez! (again) Class all set!
    Students: Yes you bet!
    Teacher: Hola! (wave hello) Me llamo___________ (hand out shaking). Hello my name is_______
    Teacher reviews several times focusing on enunciating for proper pronunciation and using gestures with the students.
    Teacher: Now using big gestures and clear voices, Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher circulates and listens for comprehension and accuracy.
    Teacher: Oh Claaaaasss!
    Students: Oh Yeeeesss!
    Teacher: Excelente!
    Teacher: Now when I say Switch! You say Switch! And the chips will be the teachers and the salsa will be the listeners! Switch!
    Students: Switch!
    Students switch teachers and teach again using gestures while teacher circulates checking for accuracy and comprehension.
    Teacher: Give yourself a pat on the back! Now give yourself a Mighty Oh Yeah!
    Students follow instruction.
    Teacher: Let’s give each other a ten finger woo!
    Students: Woo! Gesturing with fingers.
    Teacher: Turn to your friends and say Good work today!
    Students: Good work today!

    **As the students in the lower grade levels have continued practice with this routine and further Spanish language acquisition, I will introduce the WBT Teach- Ok command in Spanish- Ensena- Bien, as well as some of the other commands.**

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bethann,
      I loved this simple, yet efficient way to teach students how to greet each other in Spanish. You seem to have great control with what you expect your students to respond with and how they will answer (with fumbled pronunciation and gestures.)
      I love how you use Clase Clase. I too used this, this year, and it was so fun to hear students fumble with yese, yese, or others si, si.
      Great post! 25 certification points for your post!

      Delete
  77. Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: Classity Class!
    Students: Yessity Yes!
    Teacher: When I say Teach!, You say Okay!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Teacher: This time I am going to clap before. You do the same. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay!
    Teacher: When I say Teach, you say Okay! And then turn your body toward your partner and start teaching them about teach/okay. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay! {Students talk about teach/okay.}
    Teacher: Class! (holding nose)
    Students: Yes! (holding nose)
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about ending our sentences with punctuation! Tell your partner how pumped you are about learning about punctuation. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay! {Students talk about how pumped they are to be learning about punctuation.}
    Teacher: We put punctuation at the end of our sentences to close it out. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay!
    Teacher: Classy, classy!
    Students: Yessy, yes!
    Teacher: A period (make period) is used at the end of a statement (wagging finger). (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay!
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: A question mark (draw air question mark) is used at the end of a question (shrug shoulders with hands out). (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay!
    Teacher: Classssssssy Class!
    Students: Yessssssssy Yes!
    Teacher: An exclamation mark (draw air exclamation mark) is used when to show excitement (wave hands in the air). (clap, clap) Teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Okay!
    Teacher: What great energetic gestures! Might Oh Yeah!
    Students: Oh yeah!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Courtney,
    I found myself doing the gestures with your post. It is fun how we (WBT teachers) find the simple things to be so FUN! Great post, here are your 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  79. Letter-of-the-week (ex: s,S) lesson for Kindergarten.

    Teacher: Class, Ghost!
    Students: Yes, OOOOOOO!

    Teacher: We are going to talk about our letter of the week. Who remembers the name of our letter of the week? (Students raise their hands. Teacher chooses one student to name the letter.) Exactly! Let’s give a 10-finger witch’s laugh to <> for remembering the name of the letter. Now, when I say “Teach”, I want you to turn to your partner, point to the letter and say: That is the letter S. Teach!
    Students: OKAY! (Students immediately turn to their partner and start pointing to the card with the letter S, saying, “That is the letter S.”)

    Teacher: Class, class, October!
    Students: Yes, yes, Halloween!

    Teacher: The letter ‘S’ says “s-s-s-s-s”. (Teacher is making the gesture for the sound at the same time.) This time, when I say: “Teach”, I want you to turn to your partner, point to the letter and say: "That is the letter ‘S’. The letter says “s-s-s-s-s”. Don’t forget to use your gestures! Teach!
    Students: OKAY! (Students turn to their partner, point to the card and say, “That is the letter ‘S’. The letter ‘S’ says “s-s-s-s-s”. The teacher checks to make sure that they are using big gestures.)

    Teacher: Class, class, black cat!
    Students: Yes, Yes, Meow!

    Teacher: Who can think of a word that starts with the letter ‘S’? (Teacher and students brainstorm words that begin with the letter ‘S’.) When I say “Teach”, I want you to turn to your partner and say: “A word that begins with the letter ‘S’ is <>. I also want you to add a gesture to the word to make it more fun! Teach!
    Students: OKAY! (Students turn to their partner and start saying words and making up gestures to accompany their words.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I feel like this lesson is incomplete so I have added an end to it!

      Teacher: Class, Class, Class!
      Students: Yes, Yes, Yes!

      Teacher: This (holding card with the letter of the week on it) is the letter of the week. Thumbs up if what I say next is true. Thumbs down if it is not true. This is the letter B!
      Students: (Thumbs down, giggling)

      Teacher: This is the letter S!
      Students: (Thumbs up, nodding their heads)

      Teacher: The letter S says m-m-m-m-m.
      Students: (Thumbs down, giggling)

      Teacher: You’re right! Everyone knows that the letter S says b-b-b-b-b.
      Students: (Thumbs down, laughing)

      Teacher: (Looking confused) The letter S … does it say s-s-s-s-s-s?
      Students: (Thumbs up! Happy! Happy!)

      Teacher: Great job! You guys are experts on the letter ‘S’! Turn to your partner and tell them how proud you are to be a letter ‘S’ expert!

      Delete
    2. Christina,
      Nice work! You extended to use more of the 5 step lesson plan! These teach/okay moments will really reinforce the letter and sound as they practice and teach each other. Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
    3. T: Class
      S: Yes
      T: Today, we are going to learn how to do something new. Turn to your partner and tell him/her how excited you are to learn something new.
      S: I’m so excited to learn something new.
      T: Class! Class!
      S: Yes! Yes!
      T: Today, we are going to learn what a digraph is. Now, rub your hands together and with your best evil scientist laugh, tell your partner how you can’t wait to learn what a diagraph is!
      S: I can’t wait to learn about what a diagraph is!
      T: Oh class!
      S: Oh yes!
      T: Hands and Eyes
      S: Hands and Eyes
      T: What is a diagraph, hmmm? (Shrugging shoulders like you don’t know). I want you to ask your partner or lesson question until I call you back. Teach!
      S: OK! What is a diagraph, hmmm? (Continue until every partner pairs have had a chance)
      T: OK Class!
      S: OK Yes!
      T: Mirrors (with gestures)
      S: Mirrors (with gestures)
      T: Mirror with words (with gestures)
      S: Mirror with words (with gestures)
      T: A diagraph is (with gesture)
      S: A diagraph is (with gesture)
      T: Two consonants that squish together (with gestures)
      S: Two consonants that squish together (with gestures)
      T: To make one sound (with gestures)
      S: To make one sound (with gestures)
      T: A diagraph is two consonants that squish together to make one sound (with gestures)
      S: A diagraph is two consonants that squish together to make one sound (with gestures)
      T: Hands and eyes
      T: I want you to teach your partner what a diagraph is. Te Te Teach!
      S: O O Okay! A diagraph is two consonants that squish together to make one sound (with gestures)
      T: Great job! Now that you know what a digraph is, we are going to work on finding them on our Keyword Charts. I would like for you to grab for chart and head to the reading table.
      S: Grab chart and head to reading table.

      Jana Greer

      Delete
    4. Jana,
      I love the "evil scientist laugh"! Great job, here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  80. Class!
    Yes!
    Today we’re going to learn the steps of revising an essay. Turn and tell your neighbor what we are going to learn. Ready, teach!
    Okay! (students state objective)
    Class! Class!
    Yes! Yes!
    The word that will help us remember what to do when revising is ARMS. (show body builder pose and then write ARMS vertically on board) Use a complete sentence to tell your neighbor what word will help us remember what to do. Teach!
    Okay! The word ARMS…
    Classity! Classity!
    Yessity! Yessity!
    Each letter of ARMS stands for a different step in revising. There are 4 steps that you need to remember. Tell your neighbor how many steps there are in revising. (clap, clap) Teach!
    (clap, clap) Okay! There are 4 steps…
    Oh class!
    Oh yes!
    A is for Add R is for Remove M is for Move S is for Substitute
    Turn to your neighbor and tell them what ARMS stands for. Duh, duh-duh teach!
    Duh, duh-duh okay! In the word ARMS, A is for…
    Claaaaaas!
    Yeeeeees!
    Ask me, “What do we ADD?”
    “What do we ADD?”
    I’m so glad you asked! (proceed to explain the process, using gestures and call backs to help students retain information and stay engaged in lesson.

    Traci Katz

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Traci,
      Nice work! In WBT we like to chunk as much as possible to help give more opportunities for repetition (growing dendrites!). For example, when you teach "A is for Add", stop and do a teach/okay with the gestures. Then, add the next letter and do a teach/okay. They can repeat the previous letter each time, building even more repetition and memory. Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  81. Lesson: Reading-Vocabulary/Details

    Teacher: Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Today in our Making Connections we are going to learn all about the titan arum. (Teacher holds nose)
    Turn to your partner and, using gestures, tell what we are going to learn about today. (Students turn to partners and tell they are going to learn about the titan arum.)

    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!

    Teacher: The titan arum is a very rare flower. It is rare because there are not many flowers like it.

    Please turn to your partner and tell why the titan arum is so rare.
    (Students turn and tell why the titan atrium is a rare flower.)

    Teacher: Class! Class!
    Students: Yes! Yes!

    Teacher: What else makes the titan arum rare? (Holding up one finger.) It lives for forty years. (Holding up two fingers.) It only blooms two or three times in its life.
    (Hold up three fingers) It has a very special smell (hold nose.)
    Partner number one when I say, “teach” say, “OK” then turn and tell your partner the three things that make a titan arum rare.

    Students say OK then turn and tell partners three things that make the titan arum rare.

    Teacher: Switch! Teach!:
    Students: OK! And then switch so partner number two is talking.

    Teacher: Oh Class!
    Students: Oh Teacher!

    Teacher: When we learn words that describe something, we are learning details (use 1,2.3. finger movement). We just learned 3 details about the titan arum.
    Remember that details describe something.

    When I say “Teach!” partner number one will tell your partner what a detail does.
    “Teach!”
    Students “OK” and turn and tell partner, with gestures, what a detail does.
    Teacher: “Switch!”
    Students switch and tell partners what a detail does, using gestures.

    Teacher: Great job! You have earned a smiley. Now open your books to page 8.

    Students: (opening books) page 8, page 8, page 8.

    (This page is the reading portion of the lesson. Students will read details about the titan arum.)


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan,
      Well, I learned something new! How interesting! Depending upon the age group, you could even break down the teach/okay more by doing a "teach" after each detail rather than grouping all three together. Small chunks is the key! Nice work! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  82. Reflection #7
    Chapters 8-10
    Juliann Caveny

    DAY 2 LESSON (7th/8th grades)
    prior to setting Independent Reading Goals

    T: Class!
    S: Yes!
    T: Today I’d like to discuss one of the most important goals of my classroom. In fact it’s so important, that even the state government included it in the Common Core Standards. (Point to CCSS.RL.7.10/8.10) Our biggest goal this year is to read materials at grade level.

    T: Now, Class, class!

    S: Yes! YES!

    T: In order to be an effective reader brain studies show that you must read for at least 20 minutes every day. I want you to turn to your neighbor and tell them how you become an effective reader. (clap, clap) TEACH!

    S: (clap, clap) OKAY! (students repeat)

    T: MIRROR ME! (hands up and ready)
    S: (hands up and waiting)

    T: Reading (ASL sign for reading) 20 minutes (flash 10 fingers twice) out of class each day (point to the door) makes (ASL sign for makes) you (point to self or other) a better reader (ASL sign for reading)
    S: (Mirror actions and words)

    T: Classity, class, class!
    S: Yessity, Yes, Yes!

    T: Hands and Eyes!
    S: (hands down, all eyes on teacher)

    T: It’s important to read every day. Let’s look at this visual. (Show visual on Promethean board of reading stats.) If you read a minimum of 20 minutes you will be smarter than the average 8th grader, know more words, and score better on standardized tests.

    T: So--Reading (ASL sign for reading) 20 minutes (flash 10 fingers twice) out of class each day (point to the door) makes (ASL sign for makes) you (point to self or other) a better reader (ASL sign for reading). I want you to share what you know with a neighbor. Take turns explaining. When I yell, “SWITCH,” switch turns. (clap, clap) TEACH!

    S: (clap, clap) OKAY!

    T: CLASS!
    S: YES!

    T: There are four things that good readers do. Does anyone have an idea what one of those things might be? (Take a few suggestions.) Those are all great suggestions! Studies show that the four things that good readers do are: 1. Re-read 2. Visualize what they read. 3. Use decoding skills to understand difficult words, and 4. read for 20 minutes each day.

    I have a copy of what we’ve discussed for our notebooks. On this page (hold up the page with four numbered, empty boxes) I want you to discuss with your neighbor the four things that good readers do. Come up with a gesture that we should use to remember these four things. Sketch the gesture in the box. You will have 10 minutes and then we’ll share these with the class. Are there any questions? (Hand the papers to a key student.) Remember to pass the papers quickly so everyone can get started right away. (clap, clap) TEACH!

    S: (clap, clap) OKAY! (Papers move quickly around room, students sit in small groups and discuss four qualities and begin gesturing ideas for each.)

    T: Ca---lass!
    S: Ya---ess!

    T: Let’s see what you’ve learned. Which partners want to share their gestures with the rest of the class? (Take as many volunteers as remaining time will allow.)

    S: (Will stand and use the MIRROR command and present their gestures.)

    T: Great! Now on page 5 of your Reading Notebooks, I want you to glue this page in. Remember Class Rule #1: Follow Directions Quickly. Are there any questions? (Scan room for questions). (clap, clap) TEACH!

    S: (clap, clap) OKAY!

    T: (Supervise as students work quickly to attach papers into notebook.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Juliann,
      Excellent job! You can add the scoreboard in several times during your lesson to keep the energy levels high and keep them on their toes! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  83. wendy edwards
    Chapter 8-10
    teach okay

    This is a lesson on the Blah sentence in a Genius Ladder using oral writing first.

    T- 'Classy Class'
    S-'Yessy yes'

    T-'We are going to review what a noun is today'... 'A noun is a person, place or thing'.. (with gestures from Superspeed Grammer and Writing.) 'Tell your neighbor what a noun is'...
    T- 'Teach... clap clap'
    S- 'Okay.... clap clap' (kiddos eagerly tell their neighbors what a noun is using the gestures for a person, place and thing from ssg)
    T--'OOOOO class'
    S- 'ooooooo yes'
    T- 10 finger wahoo.. that was awesome gestures and great energy- point for you!!!! Scoreboard..
    S- 'Oh yeah!' (gesture)
    T- 'Let's review what a verb is'.... 'A verb shows action'... (gesture from WBT)
    T- 'Tell your neighbor what a verb is' "teach.. clap clap clap"
    S- 'Okay... clap clap clap'... ( lots of action... gestures while kids turn and teach).
    T 'classsity'
    S- 'yessity'
    T -'hands hands and eyes!! great job!'-- point scoreboard...
    S-Oh yeah!! (gesture)
    T -'Raise your hand if you can tell me an animal noun'....(Clara)
    S- "Lion"- call on child with hand raised..
    T - 'great .. lets start with a capital letter in our college talk with the word THE.. Show oral writing capital letter for the word THE , then smaller gesture for word lion...
    S- 'The Lion'... with gestures...
    T 'okay who can tell me a verb the lion is doing.?' (Brian)
    S- 'runs'... hand raised response...
    T -Let's do our college talk ready...THE LION RUNS. ERRRRR (gesture for period)
    T-Teach your neighbor our college talk sentence.. "The lion runs errrr." (with gestures).Teach clap clap
    S -'Okay clap clap ' kids turn and teach the sentence to neighbor using gestures..
    T- oh class
    S- oh yes.
    T- awesome-sauce!!! Now lets write our sentence on our board..... ( we would write the Blah sentence on the blah genius ladder board......




    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wendy,
      Nice job introducing the Genius Ladder to your class! There are so many variations on the ladder that you can do something different every day of the year! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete

  84. Teacher: Class
    Class: Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn what a verb is. Our question of the day is “What is a verb?” Turn to your partner and tell them what the question of the day is. Don’t forget your gestures! (clap, clap) Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap) Okay!
    (Students turn to their partner and tell them what the question of the day is.)
    Teacher: Oh, Class!
    Oh, Yes!
    Teacher: Our question of the day is “What is a verb?” A verb is an action word. It is the word in a sentence that tells what the subject is doing. (The teacher explains this using big gestures.) Using my gestures, teach your partner what I just said. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students turn to their partners and mimic the teacher’s words and jesters.)
    Teacher: Class. Class.
    Class: Yes. Yes.
    Teacher: That turn wasn’t quite fast enough. Mighty groan! (Marking a frowny on the scoreboard) A verb is an action word. It is the word in a sentence that tells what the subject is doing. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students quickly turn and begin teaching their partners.)
    Teacher: Classity, Classity.
    Class: Yessity, yessity.
    Teacher: That was much better. (Marking as smiley point on the scoreboard.) A verb is an action word. It is the word in a sentence that tells what the subject is doing. In the sentence “Jimmy ate an apple.” The word “ate” is the verb. It tells what Jimmy did. (clap, clap) Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap) Okay! (Students quickly turn and begin teaching their partners what the teacher just said.)
    Teacher: Claaaaaasssssss.
    Class: Yeeeeeeessssss.
    Teacher: Now that we answered the question “What is a verb?” and know that a verb is an action word that tells what the subject is doing in a sentence. Let’s explore more verbs. Run, clap, yell, skip are all words that tell what someone is doing. I want for your to teach your partner several different verbs, words that someone could do. Partner #1, you will go first. Keep going until I call for a switch and remember I am looking for big gestures! (clap, clap, snap, snap, wiggle, wiggle, wink) Teach!
    Class: (clap, clap, snap, snap, wiggle, wiggle, wink - giggle) Okay! (Students quickly turn and partner #1 begins teaching their partner.)
    Teacher: (After a few moments …) Switch!
    Class: Uh, Oh! Switch! (Partner #2 begins teaching)
    Teacher: (After a few moments …) Class!
    Class: Yes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Geni,
      This is a fun way to review verbs! Great job on the Teach/Okay portions! You had a couple of very minor errors "words and jesters" and "for your to teach", but it's cool - here are 20 certification points!

      Delete
  85. Teacher: 1,2,3 Class!
    Students: 1,2,3 Yes!
    Teacher: Our vocabulary word of the day is communicate. We are going to learn the definition of communicate, and then we are going to actually communicate to our partners what communicate means! TEEEACH!
    Students: Okaaaaay! (Student turn to their partner and discuss that their word of the day is communicate and that they are going to communicate what communicate means.
    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Switch! (The students switch roles and the partner who was listening is now taking their turn to speak.)
    Teacher: Very good. I especially love that most of you were encouraging your partner to talk more by cupping your ears and using hand motions. Give me an OOOOoooH yeah!! (Teacher adds point to the scoreboard).
    Students: OOooooHH yeah!!
    Teacher: Mirror!
    Students: Mirror!
    Teacher: When you communicate with someone you talk to them. (I make a talking motion with my hand).
    Students: When you communicate with someone you talk them. (Mimicking the hand motion for talking).
    Teacher: (clap, clap) teach!
    Students: (clap, clap) Ok! (The students turn to their partner and repeat the definition of communicate using the hand motion for talking.)
    Teacher: Switch, switch, switch!
    Students: Switch, switch, switch! (Students switch roles.)
    Teacher: Classiddy class class!
    Students: Yessidy yes yes!
    Teacher: Mirror!
    Students: Mirror!
    Teacher: You can communicate by talking to someone (talking motion with hand), e-mailing someone (typing motion with hands), writing a letter, (writing with an imaginary pencil motion), or calling them on the phone (my hand becomes a phone and is held up to my ear).
    Students: (Repeat ways to communicate with motions.)
    Teacher: Very good, now instead of teach I’m going to say, “Communicate” and you are going to say, “Ok!” and then communicate with your partner different ways to communicate!
    Teacher: Communicate!
    Students: Ok! (Students take turns using the motions and telling each other different ways to communicate.)
    Teacher: Classssssy!
    Students: Yesssssy!
    Teacher: Great job communicating with your partners. You are such great communicators that you are going to get a point on the scoreboard give me a karate chop, HIIIIYA!
    Students: HIIIIYA!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brooke,
      You covered several WBT strategies with the teach/okay, mirrors, switch, class/yes and scoreboard! This makes for a fun and energetic lesson! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  86. Script: Stages of Plants (kinder)

    Teacher: Class is growing…
    Class: yes, we’re learning!
    T: Today we’re going to be using our hands to learn about the 5 stages of plant growth. (clap clap) teach!
    C: (clap clap) Okay! (students paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (second student paraphrases)

    T: Yoo-who class!
    C: Yeah, yeah, yes?
    T: Let’s learn about those 5 stages. We already know that plants start as a seed. My fist is my seed. Show me your seed. Great! The first stage is roots. Roots grown down to soak up water (point thumb down). (clap clap) Teach!
    C: (clap clap) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (paraphrase)

    T: My class rocks!
    C: Yes, we do!
    T: The second stage is the stem. The stem grows up to be big and strong (slide fist and arm of second hand up behind root hand). (clap clap) Teach!
    C: (clap clap) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (paraphrase)

    T: Hey, class?
    C: Hey, yes?
    T: The third stage is leaves. Leaves grow out to soak up the sun (stem hand opens thumb and pinky). (snap and point) Teach!
    C: (snap and point) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (paraphrase)

    T: Class’m?
    C: Yes’m?
    T: The fourth stage is the flower. The flower hold the pollen (open the rest of your fingers on the stem hand). (clap clap clap) Teach!
    C: (clap clap clap) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (paraphrase)

    T: (sneeze) Class?
    C: (sneeze) Yes?
    T: The fifth stage is fruit. The fruit is for you to eat (pop open hand on mouth to make a hollow sound). (clap clap) Teach!
    C: (clap clap) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch! (paraphrase)

    T: Donde esta mi clase?
    C: aqui, si?
    T: Plants grow in five stages: roots, stem, leaves, flower, fruit (demonstrate with motions). (snap point) Teach!
    C: (snap point) Okay! (paraphrase)
    T: Switch!
    C: Switch (paraphrase)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Catherine,
      Great job! You have broken the instruction down into bite size pieces that the kids will be able to remember, used great Class/Yes variations and added in the Switch to allow both partners to teach! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  87. Kindergarten Class with Weekly Vocabulary

    Teacher: Kindergarten CLASS!

    Students: Kindergarten YES?

    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about the vocabulary word teamwork.

    Students: NO WAY!

    Teacher: Teamwork is when people help each other complete a task.

    Students: Teamwork is when people help each other to complete a task.

    Teacher: I want you to turn to your partner and teach each other what teamwork means. TEACH!

    Students: OKAY!

    Students turn to their partner and teach the definition of teamwork. I walk around the classroom encouraging, repeating the definition if students are quiet or looking confused. I also designate one student to walk around and make sure students are staying on task and teaching each other.

    Teacher: Classity Class

    Students: Yesity Yes!

    Teacher: Great job teaching your partner all about our vocabulary word teamwork. Give yourself a thumbs up! Would a group like to come up and demonstrate what they taught each other?

    I then call on groups to come up and share what the definition of teamwork is.

    Teacher: Let’s give that group a ten finger woosh for coming up and sharing with us!

    Students: WOOOOOSH

    ReplyDelete
  88. Britney, nice job! I love the Ten Finger WOOOOOSH! After you teach the definition, I would suggest you add in a Teach Okay for partners to come up with specific examples of teamwork. Use the High 5 Switch to keep the engagement up until you call them back with Class! Here are 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  89. Teacher: Class, class, class,
    Students: yes, yes, yes
    Teacher: What sound does bl make? Today we are going to learn the sound for bl. Tell you partner how excited you are to learn about this sound.
    Teacher: Teach
    Students: Okay
    Teacher: Classy, class, class
    Students: Yessy, yes, yes
    Teacher: “Mirror words” Bl is a blend, b says “b” and l says “lll”. Both letters make a sound. “bl”. “Mirrors off” Teach your neighbor the sounds for bl. Teach, teach
    Students: Okay, okay
    Teacher: Class-a-doodle-doo,
    Students: Yes-a-doodle-doo
    Teacher: This word is black. B-l-a-ck (sound it out, using fingers to count each sound and a swoop to bring the word back together). Sound this word out for your neighbor.
    Teacher: Teeeeechh!
    Students: Okkkkkaaayyy!
    Teacher: Class, meow, meow
    Students: Yes, meow, meow
    Teacher: Teach your partner how to sound out these four words on the board. Clap on your knee, clap your hands, teach!
    Student: Clap on their knee, clap their hands, okay!
    Teacher: Class, oh, class!
    Students: Yes, oh, yes!

    ReplyDelete
  90. Great job, Charisse, of chunking the lesson! Love the Funtricity of your Class Yes and Teach Okays! Here are 25 points!

    ReplyDelete
  91. Me: Clipity, clipity, class!
    Students: Yesity, yesity, yes?
    Me: I am excited to teach you the THREE (use three fingers) ways to spell the sound /a/ today! Teach!
    Students: Okay! There are THREE ways to spell /a/!
    Me: Clopity, Clopity, Class!
    Students: Yopity, yopity, yes?
    Me: The first way to spell /a/ uses Magic E! It looks like this: a_e and the e is silent. Cluck, cluck,Teach!
    Students: Cluck, cluck, Okay! The first way to spell /a/ is a_e and the e is silent.
    Me: Class!
    Students: Yes?
    Me: A_e as in bake, brave, plate, grape. Teach!
    Students: Okay! A_e as in bake, brave, plate, grape.
    Class!
    Students: Yes?
    Me: There are three ways to spell /a/ and the second way is ai. Teach!
    Students: Okay! There are three ways to spell /a/ and the second way is ai.
    Me: Class, clap, clap!
    Students: Yes, clap, clap?
    Me: ai as in braid, chain, plain, train. Teach!
    Students: Okay! Ai as in braid, chain, plain, train.
    Me: Class, dear class!
    Students: Yes, dear yes?
    Me: There are three ways to spell /a/: a_e, ai, and the last way is ay. Clap, clap, Teach!
    Students: Clap, clap, Okay! There are three ways to spell /a/: a_e, ai, and ay.
    Me: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Me: ay as in way, say, play, tray. Snap, Snap, Teach!
    Students: Snap, snap, Okay! Ay as in way, say, play, tray.
    Me: I am so excited! You know the three ways to spell /a/. They are a_e, ai, and ay! Teach!
    Students: Okay! We are excited because we know the three ways to spell /a/: a_e, ai, and ay!

    Patricia Steele

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    Replies
    1. Patricia,
      Nice job! You used several Class/Yes variations and broke your steps into small chunks well! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  92. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  93. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  94. Tonya Hackett, 4th Grade
    Objective: Compare different place-value disks
    T: Class, class!
    S: Yes, yes!
    T: Class, super!
    S: Yes, duper!
    T: Today we are going to compare the value of these place-value disks. (Holds up two magnetic place value disks.) They look like they’re the same because their size is the same. BUT the value of these disks are VERY DIFFERENT (say in a scary voice). Tell your neighbor how excited you are to compare the values of these place-value disks! Teach!
    S: Okay! (Partner A teaches their neighbor that they are excited to compare the value of these place value disks.)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! (Partner B teaches their neighbor that they are excited to compare the value of these place value disks.)
    T: Class!
    S: Yes!
    T: I’m going to take this blue 1s place-value disk and place it in this place value home on the board. This is “Olivia Ones Place”. Olivia One lives here and her house can hold up to nine of these 1s place-value disks. Ta-Ta-Teach!
    S: O-O-Kay! (Student A teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! (Student B teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: Classery, class!
    S: Yessery, yes!
    T: Olivia Ones’ house can hold one 1s place-value disk, two 1s place-value disks, three 1s place-value disks, four 1s place-value disks, five, (teacher keeps adding a 1s place-value disk each time in Olivia Ones place), six, seven, eight and EVEN nine 1s place-value disks BUT THAT’S THE MAX! (Teacher makes body as big as possible). Teach (clap-clap-throw action)!
    S: Okay (clap-clap-throw) Student A teaches neighbor what the teacher just said.
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! Student B teaches neighbor what the teacher just said.
    T: Class, class bubble!
    S: Yes, yes, on the double!
    T: Just because there’s no more room in Olivia Ones place for this tenth 1s place-value disk doesn’t mean we’re going to throw it away! No WAY! Everything is going to be just fine because Olivia Ones place neighbor is Ted Tens place and he always has “groups of ten” friends at his house. Is this a group of ten at Olivia Ones place? Can Olivia have ten 1s place-value disks? NO! But they all can go over to Ted Tens place as a group of ten. That way no one is left out! Teach, teach, TEACH!
    S: Okay, okay, OKAY! (Student A teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! (Student B teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: Class, class, place!
    S: Yes, yes, value!
    T: Now when all these ten 1s place-value disks are in Ted Tens place, they are one group (teacher circles all ten with dry-erase marker) and fit inside a new disk: a 10s place-value disk (teacher place a 10s place-value magnetic disk in Ted Tens place and removes the ten 1s place-value disks). Even though this place-value disk is the same size as one of these 1s place-value disks, the value is different because there are really ten 1s place-value disks inside of this 10s place-value disk so Ten 1s make one 10s disk or we say, One 10s disk is ten times as many as one 1s disk. Teach, TEACH!
    S: Okay, OKAY! (Student A teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! (Student B teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: Class, class burpy!
    S: Yes, yes, chirpy!
    T: Let’s review! These place-value disks (holding up a 1s and a 10s) are the same size BUT ARE VERY DIFFERENT (in a scary tone). The value of this disk is ONE. The value of this disk is TEN ONES! Olivia Ones place can only hold up to nine 1s place-value disks. If another comes along, they form a party of or group of ten 1s place-value disks (teacher then holds up a 10s place-value disk) and go hang out in Ted Tens place! This 10s disk is ten times as many as this 1s disk. Teach, teach, TEACH!
    S: Okay, okay, OKAY! (Student A teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: SWITCH! (Student B teaches their neighbor what the teacher just said.)

    ReplyDelete
  95. Tonya,
    Great job chunking each step of the lesson! Nice use of the SWITCH and class/yes variations as well! Here are 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete
  96. Adjectives lesson

    I originally wrote this lesson to include mirrors and scoreboard, then realized they come later in the certification process, so I rewrote to condense the lesson and included only teach, okay.

    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    T: Today we are going to learn how adjectives can transform our writing. Teach your partner what we are going to learn today. Clap, clap…Teach!
    S: Clap, clap…Okay! (Students teach).
    T: (chuckling) okay, okay class.
    S: (chuckling) okay, okay yes.
    T: Today we will add adjectives to our sentences to make them more descriptive which makes them more interesting to the reader. Student A will begin and teach until I say switch, then student B will take over: TEEEEEACH!
    S: Ooooookay! (Student A teaches)
    T: SWITCH!
    S: OKAY! (Student B teaches)
    T: My, my, my class!
    S: My, my, my yes!
    T: An adjective is a word that describes a noun. Teach, Teach, Teach!
    S: Okay, Okay, Okay (students teach each other)
    T: (In a loud whisper) CLASS!
    S: Yes!
    T: An adjective descrives a noun. For example, fluffy cloud. Fluffy describes how the cloud looks. (Teacher uses gestures) Teach your neighbor the definition of adjective and use an original example. Student B begins… Teach, teach!
    S: okay, okay! (Student B teaches).
    T: UH-OH Switch!
    S: UH-OH Okay! (Student A teaches)
    T: Class Boom!
    S: Yes Boom!
    T: I heard some fantastic examples of adjectives! (On the board write this: The _________ cat chased the __________ dog through the yard.) Are you ready for a challenge?
    S: Yes! (My students are always ready for a challenge.)
    T: Take turns adding adjectives to this sentence. Remember to use the high-five switch! Student A goes first. Ready….teach!
    S: Ready….okay! (Students take turns filling in the blanks with adjectives. After one student completes his task, they say switch while they high five. The teacher listens in for different types of adjectives to use when teaching all the different types of adjectives. For example, looks like, feels like, sounds like, etc.)

    The lesson will continue with creation of an anchor chart about adjectives.

    Kimberley Nixon
    second grade

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    Replies
    1. Kimberley,
      This is a wonderful way to introduce adjectives! Nice use of the class/okay, SWITCH, and the high five switch. After all of the opportunities to practice and review, they will be adjective experts! Here are 25 certification points and a 5 point bonus!

      Delete
  97. Nicole Desrosiers Weare, NH

    (This lesson would be completed mid-year during the introduction of one of our famous Jargon Journal stories.)

    T- Ooooh, class! (spoked in a descending voice)
    S- Ooooh, yes! (mimicked in the same descending voice)
    T- Today is Friday and it is time for yet another fabulous Jargon Journal story. Tell you partner how excited you are for our new story. (Clap, Clap) Teach!
    S- (clap, clap) Okay! (students tell each other they are excited)
    T- Class!
    S- Yes!
    T- Today’s amazing new story is called Lincoln and Grace by Steve Metzger. It is a story about a young girl’s influence on President Lincoln. Tell your partner about our new story. (air guitar) Teach!
    S- (air guitar) Okay!
    T- Claaas? (spoken in ascending voice)
    S- Yeees? (mimicked in same voice)
    T- As we always do when introducing a new Jargon Journal story, I want to teach you four important words that will be used in our story. Tell your partner how excited you are to learn these four new words. (whisper clap) Teach!
    S- (whisper clap) Okay! (students tell each other they can’t wait to learn four new words)
    T- Oh, class!
    S- Oh, yes!
    T-The first new word in glimpse. (Students will automatically repeat the word as they have been instructed to do. Teacher says word first, then places word card on easel in front of students.) Glimpse is a noun. Class?
    S- Yes?
    T- Please show me a noun.
    S- (Using gestures and working from a previous Power Pix lesson.) A noun is a person, a place or a thing.
    T- Very well done! Glimpse means a quick look or a view. Please teach your partner the meaning of glimpse. When I say “switch”, please remember to say “switch” and to high 5 your partner. (clap, clap, stomp) Teach!
    S- (clap, clap, stomp) Okay! (students teach each other the meaning of the word glimpse.)
    T - Switch!
    S- Switch! (partners high 5 each other to indicate the switch and partner two will then teach)
    T- Oh, my class!
    S- Oh, my yes!
    (Instruction would continue with the next three new words, along with partner predictions about how the words could be used in the upcoming new story.)

    My lessons that include Teach-Okay have been very powerful in my classroom. When used along with gestures, students are able to hold onto the information they have learned for longer periods of time. They are kept fully engaged in the lesson and begin to understand the power of teaching another person.

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    Replies
    1. Nicole,
      Nice job! This is the perfect way to introduce vocabulary words in a fun and meaningful way! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  98. This lesson would be for a 4th grade class which is already familiar with fractions.

    Teacher: Oooh Class!
    Students: Oooh Yes!

    Teacher: This morning our question is, “How do I find a fraction of an amount?” Mirror-Words.
    Students: Mirror-words. (Students raise their hands)

    Teacher: Our question this morning is... (Teacher uses gestures)
    Students: Our question this morning is... (Students mirror the teacher’s gestures)

    Teacher: ...how do I find a fraction of an amount? (Teacher uses gesture for fraction – one fist above the other, and invents a gesture for amount)
    Students: ...how do I find a fraction of an amount? (Students mirror the teacher’s gestures)

    Teacher: Tell your shoulder partner what this morning’s question is. (Claps twice) Teach!
    Students: (Clap twice) Okay! (Students make full turns towards their neighbours and teach each other the question using the teacher’s gestures. The teacher walks around checking for full class engagement by praising or prompting)

    Teacher: Poly-class-ter!
    Students: Poly-yes-ter!

    Teacher: Mirror-Words. (Teacher raises his hands)
    Students: Mirror-Words. (Students raise their hands ready to mirror the teacher’s gestures).

    Teacher: To find a fraction of an amount... (Teacher uses gestures)
    Students: To find a fraction of an amount... (Students mirror the teacher’s gestures)

    Teacher: ...I first divide the amount by the denominator... (Teacher uses gestures for amount and denominator – bottom fist)
    Students: ...I first divide the amount by the denominator... (Students mirror the teacher’s gestures)

    Teacher: ...then multiply the answer by the numerator. (Teacher uses gestures for multiply [cross arms in an ‘X’], answer and numerator [shake top fist])
    Students: ...then multiply the answer by the numerator. (Students mirror the teacher’s gestures)

    The teacher would repeat this once or twice more using Mirror-Words.

    Teacher: Mirrors off!
    Students: Mirrors off!

    Teacher: Ones please tell the twos how to find a fraction of an amount. When you have finished explaining use a pinkie switch to swap over, then the twos teach the ones. (Claps twice) Teach!
    Students: (Clap twice) Okay! (Ones teach the twos and the twos silently mirror the ones’ gestures).

    Teacher walks around checking for big gestures – praise/prompt and leave.

    Teacher: Switch!
    Students: Oh-oh, switch! (Pairs of children touch pinkies. Twos now teach the ones and the ones silently mirror the twos’ gestures).


    Quentin Dalrymple
    3/4th grade
    Perthshire, Scotland.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quentin,
      Nice work! You used the Class/Yes variations, Switch, Teach/Okay, Mirror Words and PPL quickly and efficiently! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  99. Chapter 8-10: Teach-Okay
    July 14, 2016

    Teacher: Oh class, oh class, oh class!
    Students: Oh yes, oh yes, oh yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn about a new letter!
    Teacher: Tell your partner, “Oh sweet Momma I’m so excited!”
    Students: “Oh Sweet Momma I’m so excited!”
    Teacher: Oh sweet class!
    Students: Oh sweet yes!
    Teacher: Mirror words.
    Students: Mirror words.
    Teacher: (pointing with each word) This is the letter M!
    Students: (pointing with each word) This is the letter M!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Students teach “This is the letter M!” to their partner over and over.
    Teacher: Class!
    Students: Yes!
    Teacher: (pointing with each word in a high voice) This is the letter M!
    Students: (pointing with each word in a high voice) This is the letter M!
    Teacher: Teach!
    Students: Okay!
    Students teach “This is the letter M!” to their partner over and over with motions and a high voice.
    Teacher: Class, class, class!
    Students: Yes, yes, yes!
    Teacher: Who knows what letter this is?
    Teacher: Eyes on Kim!
    Students: Eyes on Kim!
    Kim: (pointing with each word) This is the letter M!
    Teacher: Let’s give Kim a ten finger whoo!
    Students: Whoo hoo!
    Teacher: Ohhhhhhhh class!
    Students Ohhhhhhhh yes!
    Teacher: Mirror words!
    Students: Mirror words!
    Teacher: This is the letter M!
    Students: This is the letter M!
    Teacher: The M
    Students: The M
    Teacher: Says mmmmmm
    Students: Says mmmmmm
    Teacher: This is the letter M.
    Students: This is the letter M.
    Teacher: The M says mmmmm.
    Students: The M says mmmmm.
    Teacher: Teach, teach, teach!
    Students: Okay, okay, okay!
    Students teach their partner, “This is the letter M. The M says mmmm.”
    Teacher: Classity, class!
    Students: Yessity, yes!
    Teacher: Who can tell us about our letter today?
    Teacher: Eyes on Randi!
    Students: Eyes on Randi!
    Randi: This is the letter M. The M says mmmm.
    Teacher: Let’s give Randi a ten finger whoo.
    Students. Whoo hoo!
    Teacher: Hands and Eyes!
    Students: Hand and Eyes!
    Teacher: Now we are going to play the thumbs up thumbs down game! I am going to say a word if it starts with a mmmmmm sound we will give a thumbs up. If the words does not start with a mmmmm sound we will give it a thumbs down.
    Teacher: Whisper the letter sound we are listening for in our thumbs up thumbs down game today to your partner.
    Teacher: Claaaaaaaasss!
    Students: Yeeeeeeeesss!
    Teacher: Monkey, money, kangaroo, lion, Momma, hot dog, milk, mail.
    As a teacher I would use this game as a quick assessment in order to determine to either go on with the lesson with a sound sort or to go back and reintroduce the letter again.

    Britta Hartman

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    Replies
    1. Britta,
      Great use of repetition and praise! Here are 25 certification points!

      Delete
  100. Vocabulary Lesson- Fourth Grade

    Teacher: Class, Class!
    Student: Yes, Yes!
    Teacher: Today we are going to learn the word __________. Explain the word (definition) using gestures.
    Teacher: (Clap, Clap) Teach!
    Students: (Clap, Clap) Okay! (Student one should be using teaching gestures to teach their partner about the vocabulary word. Student two should be listening.)
    Teacher: Is moving around the room listening, praising, or prompting each group.
    Teacher: (Stomp, Stomp) Switch!
    Students: (Stomp, Stomp) Okay! (Student two is teaching using gestures, while student one is listening)
    Teacher: Is moving around the room listening, praising, or prompting each group.
    Teacher: Classity, Class!
    Students: Yessity, Yes!
    Teacher: Who knows the meaning of the word________?
    Teacher: Eyes on ________!
    Students: Eyes on _______!
    Student: Explains what the word means using gestures.
    Teacher: Lets give________ an air high five.
    Students: Air high five.
    Then students would go and write or draw in their vocabulary notebooks about the word they just learned.
    Katlen Downey

    ReplyDelete
  101. Katlen,
    Using the teach/okay helps them really "get" the meaning as they are watching, repeating, moving and having fun! Here are 25 certification points!

    ReplyDelete